• English Department


  • English Classes


    ENG 103

    FRESHMAN ENGLISH I is designed to help students become better writers. Students read and discuss classic and contemporary literary works used as models for their own writing. Students are introduced to a variety of writing activities throughout the course, including the four major discourses of writing (description, narration, exposition, and persuasion). Writing guidelines and rhetorical strategies are studied as students work through the stages of the writing process. Grammatical correctness and accuracy will be expected of student writing. Students build awareness of their own writing style.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 104

    FRESHMAN ENGLISH II is designed to continue with the development of the student as writer. Concentration on the organizational structure of the thematic process equips the student with the necessary skills for any academic discourse. The research paper is emphasized, with guidelines and strategies for doing research. Students read and discuss classic and contemporary literary works used as models for their own writing. Students build awareness of their own writing styles. Grammatical correctness and accuracy will be expected of student writing.
    Prerequisite: ENG 103
    3 credit hours


    ENG 225

    ADVANCED COMPOSITION I offers an intense practice in the process of exposition. Students will work with audience and purpose, along with the rhetorical devices used both in argumentative and persuasive writing. Both analytical writing and an advanced research study will complete this course. Computer-assisted instruction is utilized as a tool in the writing process.
    Prerequisite: ENG 104
    3 credit hours


    ENG 290

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION is a fundamental course in the principles of effective communication, including intrapersonal and interpersonal communication as a basis for effective public speaking. Work on development of the speaking voice, correct diction, and enumeration is stressed.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 320

    BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING deals with the genre of informational writing found in scientific prose and in Business communication. Not only are composition and format skills stressed, but the strategy behind this writing is also studied, especially with the job-packet section (résumé/interview). A foundation of composition knowledge is necessary for this course. Computer-assisted instruction as a tool in the writing process is optional.
    Prerequisite: ENG 103 or 104
    3 credit hours


    ENG 321

    ADVANCED COMPOSITION II continues with the argumentative process where audience analysis becomes a focus and where the appeal to both logic and emotion is studied and modeled. Students should know composition techniques and should have a command of the research process. Computer-assisted instruction as a tool in the writing process is utilized.
    Prerequisite: ENG 225
    3 credit hours


    ENG 322

    RHETORIC covers the study of syllogistic/logical strategy, persuasive writing, and the principles involved not only in rhetoric, but also in the rhetorical act. Focus on fallacious argumentation in political and advertising rhetoric alerts students to manipulative techniques. Critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills are the main ingredients of this class. Students need a thorough understanding of research and composition skills before taking this course.
    Prerequisites: ENG 103 or ENG 104; ENG 225 or 321
    3 credit hours


    ENG 327

    GRAMMAR AND ITS TEACHING METHODS is designed to meet the needs of students who will teach English on the secondary level or who will continue with graduate studies in English. The study of grammar includes traditional, structural, and transformational terminology and characteristics. The methodology includes sentence expansion, sentence combining, and other classroom teaching strategies. Grammar will be approached as a functional and rhetorical device to the writing process and not in total isolation. Students who register for this course should have some general knowledge of grammar.
    Prerequisite: ENG 103 or 104 or 225 or 321
    3 credit hours


    ENG 328

    TEACHING WRITING AS A PROCESS is designed to meet the needs of those students who are working on secondary certification. Since composition theory is part of the high school curriculum, students can concentrate on methods of teaching composition. The nucleus of this course focuses on the stages of the writing process, along with various teaching techniques. Students have the opportunity to simulate a classroom situation where they will present a lesson in composition study so that different methods can be critiqued for their effectiveness.
    Prerequisite: ENG 103 or 104 or 225 or 321
    3 credit hours


    ENG 332

    CREATIVE WRITING provides training and practice in the use of imaginative writing: the short story, poetry, and the one act play, with particular emphasis given to the demands of each genre. Students will read good work, learn the value of risk, language play, precision, and revision as they participate in a workshop approach.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 334

    WRITING POETIC FORMS teaches scansion and other elements of contemporary formal prosody. Students in this course will imitate poetic forms, and in doing so both develop a sense of the relationship between content and re-usable forms, and discover the value of surprise and revision. A workshop approach will be employed as they study forms such as sonnet, villanelle, rondeau, sestina, and haiku.
    Prerequisite: ENG 332
    3 credit hours


    ENG 400

    INTERNSHIP is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in the areas of literature, writing, or drama. The faculty member serving as the director of the internship may require a capstone paper or project about the internship that serves to integrate the student’s work experience with scholarship. Students should have at least a 3.0 quality point average in the major and at least a 2.5 average overall. Students seeking internships are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall, and a contract and registration must be made prior to doing the internship. Internships count as general electives.
    Prerequisite: English Junior or Senior standing and permission of the department chair.
    Internships must be preapproved.
    1-6 credit hours


    ENG 406

    FICTION WRITING offers intense practice in the writing of short stories. Students will read good contemporary work and workshop their own writing as they attempt to make art from the margins, to tackle tough Christian issues. And in the process of doing so, they will learn to manipulate the elements of fiction, including, among others, point of view, characterization, setting, symbol, and psychic distance.
    Prerequisite: ENG 332
    3 credit hours


    ENG 407

    POETRY WRITING offers intense practice in the writing of poetry. Modeling and a workshop focus will help students to appreciate and value surprise, density of image, and questions regarding line and rhythm as they attempt to, in Frost’s words, move from “delight to wisdom.”
    Prerequisite: ENG 332
    3 credit hours


    ENG 408

    PLAYWRITING is an introduction to the development of narrative line, character, and dialogue in an original dramatic text. By the end of the semester, the student will have completed a short play, which will receive a staged reading and open critique.
    Prerequisite: ENG 332
    Cross-listed with DRA 408
    3 credit hours


    ENG 420

    WRITING CREATIVE NONFICTION is designed to help students experience the genre of creative nonfiction and to study its characteristics. This literature, known as the “literature of fact,” is that branch of writing which employs literary techniques and artistic vision associated with fiction or poetry in order to report actual events and persons. Students discuss and analyze creative nonfiction readings, using them as models for their own writing.
    Prerequisite: ENG 103 or 104 or 225 or 321 or 332
    3 credit hours

    LITERATURE COURSES

    ENGLISH MAJORS WITH BRITISH and AMERICAN LITERATURE CONCENTRATION must meet the requirements in the following areas: A) ENG 210, 211, 226 and 325; B) Two American courses from ENG 235, 300, 301, 302, 415, 421 (at least one of the two must be 300, 301, 302, or 415); C) One Single Major Author from ENG 324, 331, 447; D) One Early Period from ENG 326, 335, 340; E) One 19th Century from ENG 345, 346; F) One Modern Period from ENG 350, 410, 416, 440, 445; G) One Miscellaneous from ENG 336, 375, 404, 409, 430 or any additional course from B through F. H) Thesis ENG 434.

     

    ENG 201

    LITERARY GENRES AND CRITICAL APPROACHES serves as the department’s gateway course to the study of literature, introducing students to fundamental generic questions and an array of current critical approaches to literature. Student work is focused upon the critical reading of one or two exemplary English language masterworks in each of three literary genres---poetry, drama, and prose fiction---in conjunction with the study of several significant critical essays devoted to each of these works. Evaluation is based upon several (at least three) student papers submitted during the course of the semester that stake out and defend a position on the literary work in relation to the critical approaches studied. Required of all English majors and Education majors seeking AYA certification in English.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 203

    STUDIES IN POETRY is designed to improve the student’s ability to read and appreciate poetry. By studying representative poems, the student can acquire knowledge of various kinds of poems, learn and practice a technique of critical reading, and understand the unique power that poetry exercises over the hearts and minds of men. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)
    3 credit hours


    ENG 204

    STUDIES IN FICTION is designed to improve the student’s ability to read and appreciate fiction. By studying representative stories, the student can understand how different aspects of fiction(conflict, plot, characterization, style, point of view, etc.) illuminate themes and ideas that often elude a casual reading. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)
    3 credit hours


    ENG 205

    STUDIES IN DRAMA is designed to improve the student’s ability to read and appreciate dramas. Since nearly all dramas are intended for enactment on a stage, the reader’s imaginative powers are required to appreciate fully the playwright’s intent. By studying representative plays, students gain insight into the richness and diversity of drama and enhance their capacity to appreciate live dramatic productions. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)
    3 credit hours


    ENG 209

    WORLD EPICS treats epics that are foundational for ideas and images of Western literature, as well as epics that serve the same role in non-Western countries. The epic is examined as literature, history, philosophy, theology, ethics and travel guide combined. Western works may include the Homeric epics, The Aeneid, Jerusalem Delivered, The Song of Roland, Parzifal, or the Morte D’Arthur. Non-western epics may include sections from the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Analects of Confucius, or the Mali Epic of Son-Jara among others.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 210

    EPIC AND THE PERSON invites students to explore changing relations between the individual and society in and through classic examples of Western epic. Course readings allow students to see both continuity and difference in the passage from Greek and Roman epic (e.g., Iliad and The Aeneid) to Dante’s Christian masterpiece, The Divine Comedy. St. Augustine’s reflections on the soul in the Confessions provide an important hinge in the course as we explore the movement from pagan classical to medieval Christian conceptions of culture, society, and selfhood. (Literature Core)
    3 credit hours


    ENG 211

    LYRIC AND DRAMATIC VOICES focuses upon examples of lyric poetry and drama, with special attention to voice and the way in which selected examples of these two literary genres characterize human subjectivity. The course proceeds through three units: ancient lyric and dramatic voices (Greek lyric and tragedy, the Psalms); early modern/Renaissance lyric and dramatic voices (several plays of Shakespeare, as well as selected sonnets and other English lyric poetry of the period); and modern lyric and dramatic voices (e.g., Wordsworth, Keats, Hopkins, Yeats, Eliot, and a novel such as Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment). Each unit contains representative masterpieces that are significant for an understanding of the development and articulation over time of a specifically Christian literary voice. (Literature Core)
    3 credit hours


    ENG 226

    CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY is a background course in Greek and Roman mythology. Readings will be taken from classical literature in translation as well as from later compilations. Attention will be given to the many ways in which classical mythology still touches our culture in art, music, and literature. The implications of various myths for psychology, anthropology, theology, philosophy, and history will be discussed.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 227

    PHILOSOPHICAL AND BIBLICAL IMAGERY IN LITERATURE examines a particular theme (or themes) that can be fruitfully addressed through selected literary, philosophical, biblical and theological readings. Through the theme or themes addressed, students are introduced to concepts, images, and stories that have played and continue to play a significant role in literature and art (e.g., Plato’s ladder of loves, the cave allegory, the chariot of the soul, and son on; Aristotle on friendship, the unmoved mover, places of invention and poetics, and so on; biblical well-springs of literature; various Patristic and medieval contributions); at the same time, students are guided to discover and think about the many ways in which philosophical and theological thinking and discourse relate to the reading and analysis of literary works. Theme(s) will be listed as part of the title.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 235

    THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE studies the experience of the African-American as found in American literature from colonial times to the present, including representative works from writers of color. Special prominence is given to slave narratives of the 19th century and images of the African-American in 20th century works.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 280

    PHONICS AND THE HISTORY OF LANGUAGE is the study of the phonology, morphology, syntax and grammar of the English language, and its relationship to other languages in the Indo-European family. Students learn methods of representing the sounds of current English, as well as those of earlier forms of English, the common Germanic language from which it evolved, and the Indo-European parent language.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 300

    AMERICAN POETRY surveys the ideas, images, legends, and verse method that form American poetry from colonial times to the early 20th century. Attention is given to the English and traditional quality of the poetry as well as the desire to forge a new literature based on the sense of America as a unique experiment.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 301

    AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 studies the origins and development of American literature including the study of 16th century Spanish voyages of discovery, colonial Puritanism, and the Civil War period. Emphasis is given to the development of literary forms such as the sermon, the puritan hagiography, the novel, the short story, and the corresponding evolution of myths of American identity.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 302

    AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865 concerns the literary reflections on the cataclysmic events of the American Civil War and its aftermath in modern America. This course examines how the nation’s premier writers and poets attempt to define American identity within the crises of the modern world.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 315

    DANTE’S DIVINE COMEDY comprises primarily a close study of Dante’s masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, though additional readings in his epistles, La Vida Nuova, De Monarchia, and the Convivio might illumine the major work. An understanding of the cultural, political, and theological background of the work is the major goal of the course.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 318

    EUROPEAN ROMANTICISM explores the Romantic ideal in literature as it appeared in various European nations. Dominant themes and forms of the movement are encountered in the works of major romantics and their contemporaries, such as Goethe, Schiller, Novalis, and Heine (Germany); Rousseau, Hugo, and Balzac (France); Foscolo and Leopardi (Italy); and Kierkegaard (Denmark).
    3 credit hours


    ENG 324

    SHAKESPEARE’S HISTORIES AND COMEDIES explores Shakespeare’s development as a writer of comedies and historical dramas. By studying plays representative of different phases in Shakespeare’s career, students gain an appreciation of his growing mastery over the genre of comedy and historical plays. Attention is given to Shakespeare’s development in plotting, characterization, and style from his early plays to the maturity of the high comedies. While this course primarily enables students to deal with the plays as literature, attention is also given to their nature as theatrical productions.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 325

    SHAKESPEARE: THE TRAGEDIES AND TRAGI-COMEDIES explores Shakespeare’s development as a writer of tragedies and romances. The nature of tragedy is explored as Shakespeare’s growing mastery over this genre is traced—from the early, derivative plays to the pinnacle of achievement in this form, and beyond. By studying Shakespeare’s romances, students gain an appreciation of his “last phase,” the period of the tragi-comedies. While this course primarily enables students to deal with the plays as literature, attention is also given to their nature as theatrical productions.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 326

    ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD studies English literature from its beginning to about 1485. Works such as The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, Beowulf, Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, and Mallory’s Le Morte de Arthur will be read in translation. Middle English works will be read in their original forms.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 331

    STUDIES IN CHAUCER affords students the opportunity to appreciate the richness and variety of the “Father of English Poetry.” Chaucer’s writings will be examined as exemplary works of Christian humanism. Working in the poet’s own Middle English (itself a rewarding challenge), students experience the moral complexity and timelessness of The Canterbury Tales as well as several lesser-known works such as The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, or Troilus and Cressida.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 335

    THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE studies the major literature in English from 1485 to 1650. Particular emphasis will fall on the extraordinary luxuriance of literary works that examine religiousand political issues near the end of the reign of Elizabeth I—the period that produced Lyly, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Marlowe, and Jonson.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 336

    THE METAPHYSICAL POETS examines the tendency in the late 16th and early 17th centuries to create a poetry that fused the earthly and the transcendental, the human and the divine. Attention will be given to such poets as Donne, Crashaw, Herbert, Vaughan, Traherne, and Marvell.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 340

    EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE actually begins in 1660 with the restoration of Charles II to the English throne. Writers in this period actively engaged in the great struggles over religion, politics, and philosophy. Consequently, some of the greatest satires in the English language emerged, typified by the works of John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, and Alexander Pope. This course emphasizes these writers, but also examines new literary expressions of the period such as Restoration Comedy, the periodical essay, the mock-epic, the biography, and literary criticism.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 341

    CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN POETRY provides students with an historical overview of late modernist critical theory and creative work before moving into the postmodern period. There it will show students how serious poets have wrestled with poetic matters of theme and Christian belief. Christian poets studied might begin with people like Allan Tate, Richard Wilbur, and Thomas Merton, and move into the contemporary scene with poets like Kathleen Norris, Les Murray, and Paul Mariani.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 342

    CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN FICTION provides students with an historical overview of late modernistic critical theory and creative work before moving into the postmodern period. There it will show students how serious fiction writers have wrestled with technical matters and matters of theme and Christian belief. Fiction writers studied might begin with people like Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, and Flannery O’Connor, and move into the contemporary scene with writers like Larry Woiwode, Andre DuBUS, and Ron Hansen.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 345

    THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT explores the poetic reaction to the so-called “Age of Reason” and the Industrial Revolution, attempting to balance reason with spirit and imagination, and industrialization with a renewed emphasis on nature. The poetry of this period (1798–1832), particularly the works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, will be read and analyzed.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 346

    THE VICTORIAN PERIOD is a survey of the literature of England after the Romantics and before the 20th century, the period of Victoria’s reign (1837–1901). A study of the nonfiction prose of this period gives the student a background of the major ideas of the period, which tried to yoke the spiritual/creation power of the individual to social forms including the rise of democracy, the advent of evolutionary theory, the waning of religious faith, and experiments with socialism—all of which will offer background to the major poetry of the era.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 350

    MODERN DRAMA concentrates on the revolution in the theater that occurred with the establishment of the so-called “people’s theater” in France, in Germany, and in Russia during the late 19th century. By exploring the themes, characterizations, and styles (both literary and theatrical) of playwrights such as Ibsen, Chekov, Strindberg, Shaw, O’Casey, Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, Sartre, Beckett, Brecht, and Arthur Miller, students will appreciate the diversity and the difficulty in understanding what is “modern” in modern drama.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 360

    RUSSIAN LITERATURE provides an in depth study of representative masterworks of Russian literature. Exploring prose and poetry of spiritual, literary, and political influence, the course traces the interplay of typically Russian elements and European influences. Authors studied may include Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoi, Solzhenitsyn, Mandelstamm, Akhmatova, and others.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 375

    WOMEN WRITERS is the study of representative texts from the late 18th through the 20th century, examining how women philosophers and novelists have responded to such issues as the birth of modern feminism, women’s place in the public sphere, art and what it means to be a woman artist, and marriage and the family. Authors studied may included Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Willa Cather, Zora Neale Hurston, and Sigrid Undset.
    Prerequisite: At least one previous literature course
    3 credit hours


    ENG 404

    ENGLISH DRAMA traces the development of the drama in England from its beginnings in Medieval liturgy through the Elizabethan Period (excluding Shakespeare) and the Restoration. Because the Elizabethan theater was rich in both number and quality of plays, that period (1556–1603) will constitute a major focus of the course.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 409

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL studies the novel as a genre from its beginnings to about 1850. Major writers such as Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, and the Brontë sisters will be considered as examples of major concerns and ideas.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 410

    THE MODERN BRITISH NOVEL analyzes works of selected major writers from the mid-19th century to the present. Primary attention is given to the ideas that emerge from the conflict of a religiously ordered society with a modern vision based on determinism in Dickens, the Brontës, Hardy, Ford, Joyce, Waugh, and Greene, among others.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 415

    THE AMERICAN NOVEL concerns the genesis of the novel in American literature. Attention is given to the evolution of the American novel from various myths and images of American history. Representative masterpieces by writers such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Cather, Faulkner, O’Connor, Ellison, Percy, and others will be studied.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 416

    MODERN WORLD LITERATURE presents a thoughtful selection of Western and non-Western literature designed to illustrate the variety of cultural representations as well as the tensions between Western and non-Western nations and ideals from approximately 1914 to the present. Works may include prose, poetry, and non-fiction by Achebe, Solzhenitsyn, Endo, Mishima, Borges, Mafouz, Marquez, Soyinka and others.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 421

    READINGS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single American author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 422

    READINGS IN BRITISH LITERATURE is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single British author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 423

    READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single world author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 430

    LITERARY CRITICISM undertakes a detailed analysis of statements from the Classical Period to the present using established theoretical and aesthetic standards. Students will explore not only the nature of literature, but also the very nature of the true and the beautiful, as well as of taste. They will test their criteria for evaluating works of literature against those of the most celebrated literary theorists and practitioners.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 434

    SENIOR THESIS requires all English majors to write a thesis on an approved literary problem; all students enrolled in ENG 434 must also submit with their completed thesis a Portfolio composed of samples of their English course work. Please see the “Portfolio Letter” found under the heading “Thesis Info” on the English department website for full instructions.
    1 credit hour


    ENG 440

    MODERN POETRY treats British and American poetry since the late 19th century. It focuses on the elements that define American poetry and modernity, as well as the fundamental shifts that cause us to call poetry modern. Major figures includes Pound, Eliot, Yeats, and Frost and many other British and American poets.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 445

    MODERN SHORT FICTION explores the nature of “modernism.” By examining selected novellas and short stories by writers such as Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, James, Kafka, O’Connor, Bellow, Baldwin, Ellison, Gaines, Joyce, Faulkner, and Hemingway, attention is given to both thematic and stylistic features in order to better understand what is “modern” about modern fiction.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 447

    MILTON is designed to survey the development and variety of John Milton (1608–1674) through a close study of his major poetry and prose works. A thorough reading of his epic Paradise Lost will crown the course, though a study of his earlier poetic development will illuminate that masterpiece for the student, and his prose pamphlets in support of the Puritan revolution will offer some historical and intellectual background to the period.
    3 credit hours


    ENG 449

    MODERN CRITICISM concerns itself with the major literary theorists of the 20th century.
    3 credit hours

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