• Graduate Catalog


  • Master of Arts in Business Administration

    The Graduate Faculty

    Department Overview

    Purpose: This program started in 1979 to meet the growing needs of the business community in the Ohio Valley. The program is mainly directed toward part-time students with a small number of full-time students. Most courses are offered in the evenings and some are scheduled on weekends. The MBA Program is a professional program of study intended to provide the educational foundation necessary for personal growth, and an executive career in business. Toward this end, the program includes a core of studies focusing on analytical and behavioral techniques and on institutional considerations confronting managers. The MBA Program emphasizes a highly integrated approach that focuses on the application of functional business knowledge. The aim of the program is to produce a generalist, rather than a specialist. A major objective of the program is to develop the student’s intellectual skills for solving particular problems, while keeping in harmony with overall principles and decision-making techniques essential to effective management. The goal is to have managers capable of working effectively in a wide range of organizational settings.

    Participants in the program will gain a better understanding of themselves and their potential, while developing problem-solving, communication, and leadership skills.

    Completion of the MBA Program is possible in 24 months by taking just two courses in each term of the academic calendar. If a student decides to participate in the program on a full-time basis, completion of the program is possible in 15 months.

    An option available to students is pursuing an MBA degree with a concentration in accounting. This option is open to students with an undergraduate degree in accounting and students who have completed a minimum of 24 credit hours of accounting courses and three (3) credit hours of business law. This is implemented by students selecting four electives from the BUS 830 series, which are graduate accounting courses. This option is attractive to students interested in increasing their accounting knowledge in breadth and in depth. It is especially useful to students in meeting requirements of professional certification in accounting, such as the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) designations.

    Assessment Goals

    The mission of the MBA Program is to:

    1. Prepare students for successful careers in a dynamic global environment.
    2. Support and maintain an environment of high moral and ethical standards based on the teachings and guidance of the Catholic Church.
    3. Educate students for successful and responsible business and professional careers.
    4. Provide students with the ability to solve problems ethically using proven business knowledge, concepts, and theories.
    5. Treat all students, colleagues, community partners, and visitors with dignity, respect, and courtesy.

    MBA 4 + 1 Program

    Franciscan University of Steubenville has implemented a special program for qualified accounting and business administration majors who enter Franciscan University as freshmen. Upon entering their senior year, these students may take graduate-level courses. By participating in the Master of Business Administration Program during their senior year, they can receive their undergraduate degree and then complete the MBA Program one year later.

    Senior students in other degree programs may also participate in this program provided they have completed all the undergraduate business and accounting courses required for the MBA Program.

    Information on the specific criteria that must be met by all students to participate in the program is available from the director of the MBA Program.

    Administration

    Administrative operations will be handled through the regular University offices. Prof. Joseph Zoric., MBA Program director, will coordinate the graduate program with the activities of the undergraduate program within the Department of Accounting, Business Administration, and Economics.

    Course Load

    The MBA Program is organized as a part-time program, recognizing that the majority of students are employed full-time and have family responsibilities. While nine credits per term is considered full-time status, most students register part-time, carrying six to eight credits.

    Scheduling and Sequence of Courses

    There are a total of 37 credits in the core program. The normal student load is two evenings of class per term, and a typical program will last six terms, or 24 months. The core program is highly structured and the successive courses are designed to build upon previous courses. For this reason, the student’s scheduling in the program is fairly well determined.

    All entering core students are required to register for BUS 601 Business Ethics and the Law and may take any other 600-level course. All 600-level courses should be completed prior to taking 700-level courses. However, a student may take his or her last 600-level course concurrently with his or her first 700-level course. All 700-level courses should be completed before a student takes BUS 900: Business Policy and Strategy.

    In order to give proper emphasis to leadership and interpersonal relations skill development, all students are required to take BUS 880: Communications and BUS 881: Managerial Leadership Workshop. These two courses may be taken at any time in the student’s progression through the program.

    The University permits selected students to complete a maximum of four credits of independent studies (two 2-credit electives or one 4-credit elective). There is no provision in the MBA Program for formal thesis work.

    Program Requirements for Degree Completion

    The MBA Program requires successful completion of 11 core courses and two 3-hour elective courses totaling 37 graduate credits. There is no comprehensive examination or thesis. Students must earn an overall grade average of B (3.00) for their graduate course work.

    Requirements for a Degree

    1. Fulfill the Core Program requirements: Core Courses: 37 credits, 11 courses
      BUS 601 Business Ethics and Law
      (3 credits)
      BUS 612 Economics for Managers
      (3 credits)
      BUS 613 Behavioral Science for Managers
      (3 credits)
      BUS 614 Managerial Accounting
      (3 credits)
      BUS 710 Marketing Management
      (3 credits)
      BUS 720 Financial Management
      (3 credits)
      BUS 730 Production and Operations Management
      (3 credits)
      BUS 735 International Business
      (3 credits)
      BUS 880 Communications
      (2 credits)
      BUS 881 Managerial Leadership Workshop
      (2 credits)
      BUS 900 Business Policy and Strategy
      (3 credits)
      Electives: 6 credits,
    2. File an application for graduation with the Registrar one semester before anticipated completion of the degree.

    Admission Requirements

    Admission will be granted to candidates who meet basic qualifications and show high promise for success in the program and the business community. These are the four basic qualifications that apply to all degree candidates seeking admission:

    1. A baccalaureate degree with acceptable grades from an accredited University. The minimum standard for undergraduate Quality Point Average (QPA) is 2.50. However, applicants with a QPA lower than 2.50 may be accepted if their GMAT results are high enough to counterbalance the lower QPA.
    2. Undergraduate coursework covering basic concepts and terminology in the following areas:
      1. Quantitative methods, including mathematics, differential calculus, and statistics.
      2. Business subject matter, including managerial accounting, marketing, corporate finance, management, business law, and economics.
    3. A satisfactory score (460) on the Graduate Management Admission Test (formerly the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business - ATGSB). A low GMAT score may be counterbalanced by a high undergraduate QPA.

    Prospective MBA students not admitted for failure to meet any of the above standards may appeal in writing to the MBA Program Director. The decision of the Director will be final.

    Application for Admission

    Applications must be completed and submitted before the start of the term for which the student is seeking admission. In making application for admission to Franciscan University of Steubenville as an MBA degree candidate, the student must be available for a personal interview and submit the following documents to the Graduate Admissions Office:

    1. Completed application form.
    2. All college or university transcripts sent directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions by the issuing institution.
    3. A résumé and three letters of recommendation.
    4. The GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) scores.
    5. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for all applicants whose first language or country’s official language is not English.

    Admission and Enrollment Status

    Probationary Admission
    The student may be admitted either to the prerequisite, core, or a combination prerequisite/core program on probation. Probationary status will last a minimum of one term (at least six credit hours), and will be removed if the student attains a grade average of B (3.0) or better for the courses taken during the probationary term.

    Regular Admission

    Admission to the MBA prerequisite courses:

    Students meeting admission requirements for the prerequisite portion of the program are notified of their status by mail. The letter granting the student admission to the MBA prerequisite courses states the specific prerequisites that will be required of the student.

    Transfer Credit

    Students who wish to transfer graduate course credit to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s MBA Program may be permitted to do so up to a total of nine credits. However, these transfer credits will be accepted only after the student has successfully completed a minimum of six credits with at least a B in each course in the Core Program. Following the completion of six credit hours of graduate courses at Franciscan University of Steubenville, the faculty will review the transfer of credits request and will notify the student of a decision.

    Graduate-level elective courses taken at other regionally accredited institutions may be transferred for elective credit in the MBA Program, regardless of whether the elective is taught in the MBA or not.

    Sequence of Courses

    FALL SEMESTER: August - December
    601 Business Ethics and the Law
    (3 Credits)
    614 Managerial Accounting
    (3 credits)
    710 Marketing Management
    (3 credits)
    881 Managerial Leadership Workshop
    (2 credits)
    900 Business Policy & Strategy
    (3 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)

    SPRING SEMESTER: January-May
    612 Economics for Managers
    (3 credits)
    614 Managerial Accounting
    (3 credits)
    730 Production & Operations Mgt.
    (3 credits)
    735 International Business
    (3 credits)
    880 Communications Workshop
    (2 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)

    SUMMER SESSION: April-August
    613 Behavioral Science for Managers
    (3 credits)
    720 Financial Management
    (3 credits)
    890 Independent Research
    (2 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)
    Elective (3 credits)

    Course Descriptions

    BUS 601 Business Ethics and the Law
    (3 credits)
    This course will examine the legal dimensions of the employment relationship in a non-union setting. Students will become familiar with the employment-at-will doctrine and will understand the exceptions to that doctrine. Several federal laws will also be examined including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the American with Disabilities Act, the Family Medical Leave Act, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Equal Pay Act, OSHA, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. The course will also cover other issues including privacy in the workplace, employment testing, and performance appraisals. The course will also provide students with analysis of formal and informal initiatives, processes and structures developed by business organizations and managers to address common ethical problems at work in order to prepare students to participate in their organization’s efforts to promote ethics at work.

    BUS 612 Economics for Managers
    (3 credits)
    This course aims to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of microeconomic theory and its relevance to business decision making. The heart of the course is an intensive examination of the neoclassical theories of demand, production, cost, and pricing. In addition to substantial doses of economic theory, the student will also be exposed to the procedures and problems involved in statistically measuring important economic relationships such as demand equations, production functions, and cost curves.
    Prerequisites: 611.

    BUS 613 Behavioral Science for Managers
    (3 credits)
    The study of organizational behavior is a science primarily concerned with the description of the recording, analyzing, and explaining of what happens within organizations. The course is designed to assist the manager in seeing and understanding crucial aspects of the actions and interactions that take place within organizations. It takes many of the supposedly unteachable aspects of “managerial judgment,” and puts them into forms that permit them to be learned and applied.

    BUS 614 Managerial Accounting
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to familiarize the students with the basic cost concepts and the techniques of accumulating cost data that may assist management in planning, controlling, and decision making. Topics will include the fundamentals of managerial accounting, cost classification and behavior, job order and process costing; absorption and variable costing; and standard costing and variance analysis. Budgeting and profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, capital budgeting, and investment analysis are also covered.

    BUS 710 Marketing Management
    (3 credits)
    The course focuses on the application of management tools and thoughts in the solution of problems centering in the marketing function. It covers such topics as: marketing policies, research, strategy, organization, demand analysis, product planning, pricing, physical distribution, demand stimulation, sales management, retailing and wholesaling techniques and structures, marketing law, and current marketing literature. The course also involves case studies, various types of reports and oral presentations by students; and widespread reading in current marketing periodicals.

    BUS 720 Financial Management
    (3 credits)
    The application of management tools and thought to the solution of business problems centering in the financial function. Coverage includes topics such as: financial management of business units with emphasis on organization, structure, collection, and use of financial data, profitability, liquidity, sources of capital and external financial institutions and their operations, taxes, regulation and types of lending markets and operations, insurance and risk management, investment objectives, types of investments and their relative merits, security prices and yields, and investment programs and taxes.
    Prerequisites: 611 and 614.

    BUS 730 Production and Operations Management
    (3 credits)
    The course provides an understanding of the managerial concepts and quantitative tools required in the design, operation, and control of production systems. Coverage includes topics such as productivity/ competitiveness, product design, process selection, staffing considerations, system start-up, steady-state operations, and other planning and control methods. All are couched in the framework of a product life cycle.
    Prerequisite: 611.

    BUS 735 International Business
    (3 credits)
    International Business provides the theoretical and analytical framework for students to exercise managerial decision making in the global context. The course will utilize various business and business-related disciplines in analyzing the international business environment and its impact upon organizations. The course is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of how business environments differ throughout the world, and political/legal, historical, institutional, economic, geographic, and social explanations for these differences.

    BUS 880 Communications Workshop
    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to assist participants in the development and improvement of the communication techniques required for effective management. The course stresses the importance of communication for meeting organizational goals; recognizing and examining the causes of communication problems; and developing the communications knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to achieve effective performance. Lecture, role-playing, group discussions, and various exercises are used.

    BUS 881 Managerial Leadership Workshop
    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to help participants better understand the complexities of the role of a manager and to develop the organizational, leadership and motivational skills needed to be effective. It is also designed to help the participants better understand themselves and how they affect others in the work situation. The course uses lecture, role-playing, group discussion, and various exercises.

    BUS 890 Independent Research
    (2 to 4 credits)
    Selected students will be permitted to complete a maximum of four credits of independent studies (two 2-credit electives, or one 4-credit elective). Guidance and supervision on individual research work will be provided by members of the graduate faculty.

    BUS 900 Business Policy and Strategy
    (3 credits)
    Students will analyze major decisions in the context of the entire philosophical framework of business through case studies. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of business to outside forces and to the integration of functional operations. The effects of major policy decisions on marketing, finance, manufacturing, and personnel will be analyzed. The course covers strategy, policy definition, planning, organizing, direction, control, and an in-depth look at management, its sources and responsibility. This course brings together all of the principles of business studied in previous courses. Oral and written presentations of case studies are used to further develop communication skills.

    ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS


    BUS 811 Marketing Research
    BUS 812 Sales Management
    BUS 813 Marketing Communications BUS 815 Buyer Behavior
    BUS 820 New Venture Management
    BUS 821 Topics in Financial Management
    BUS 823 Business Forecasting
    BUS 824 Real Estate
    BUS 825 Investment Management Business
    BUS 830 Financial Accounting Theory BUS 831 Governmental & Not-for- Profit Organizational Accounting
    BUS 832 Audit Problems and Case Studies
    BUS 833 Professional Ethics in Accounting
    BUS 834 Corporate Tax Planning
    BUS 841 Microcomputers in Business
    BUS 842 Human Resource Management
    BUS 851 Management Information Systems
    BUS 860 Labor Economics
    BUS 862 Current Economic Problems
    BUS 863 Government Regulation
    BUS 870 International Operations
    BUS 883 Health Care Systems and Policy
    BUS 890 Independent Research

    BUS 811 Marketing Research
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of what market research can and cannot do and to introduce a basic structure for problem analysis. Subject matter includes scope and practice of marketing research, survey technique and questionnaire construction, experimental design, data collecting, and statistical techniques.

    BUS 812 Sales Management
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to expose students to the elements of the sales management function, including the determination of amount of personal selling required for various product classes, selling tasks, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, planning, analysis,and cost performance control of the field sales force.

    BUS 813 Marketing Communications
    (3 credits)
    This course has a marketing management direction and orientation. The objective is to integrate the major elements of marketing communication in both consumer and industrial markets. These elements include advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, packaging, and publicity and public relations.

    BUS 815 Buyer Behavior
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to enable the student to understand, from a variety of perspectives, factors that affect buyer decision making. These include psychological, sociological, and cultural factors. Such an understanding provides a basis for marketing decisions that aim to enhance buyer satisfaction with the goods and services of the firm.

    BUS 820 New Venture Management
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the major facets of starting or acquiring companies. Through case study, students practice finding a suitable opportunity, appraising profit potential, determining an acceptable purchase price, negotiating terms, and raising capital.

    BUS 823 Business Forecasting
    (3 credits)
    Business forecasting concentrates on quantitative approaches to forecasting, such as regression analysis, exponential smoothing and ARIMA models. Students will gain an understanding of the limits and diagnosis of forecast models, as well as the crucial role of sound human judgment.

    BUS 825 Investment Management
    (3 credits)
    This course offers an introduction to investment principles, the function of capital markets, the investment environment, and decision-making mechanisms for the selection of appropriate investments. Incorporated are techniques, instruments, and strategies for implementing investment goals in a portfolio context, consistent with risk/return exposure. This course also provides a sound basis for management of personal financial resources.

    BUS 830 Financial Accounting Theory
    (3 credits)
    The development of financial accounting theory and practical application of that theory will be studied. Content will include review of the conceptual framework of financial accounting as promulgated by the FASB. Particular emphasis will be placed on the objectives of financial reporting, the elements of the financial statements, and the principles of recognition and measurement.

    BUS 831 Governmental and Not-for- Profit Accounting
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the accounting and financial management principles and practices associated with governmental and other not-for-profit entities. Special emphasis will be placed on state and municipal governments; however, coverage will also include the accounting/financial practices of colleges and universities, hospitals, and health and welfare agencies.

    BUS 832 Audit Problems and Case Studies
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of the audit process. The course will begin with a review of the attest function, including various phases of the audit process, such as engagement planning, audit control, and execution. Finally, coverage will return to compilation and review engagements.

    BUS 833 Professional Ethics in Accounting
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to improve the quality of ethical decisions made by accounting students in the practice of their profession by giving them a forum within which to encounter and debate the moral problems of the profession. Professional responsibilities of accountants in public and private practice will be examined, including responsibilities to clients, management, owners, colleagues, and society at large.

    BUS 834 Corporate Tax Planning
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of corporate tax planning and its application to both corporate shareholders and estates. Subject matter includes types of business entities, determination of corporate net income, taxation of distributions to shareholders, and taxability of corporate formations and liquidations.

    BUS 841 Microcomputers in Business
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of various personal computer application programs. Subject matter includes an introduction to computers, use of Microsoft Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation tools, and database tools.

    BUS 842 Human Resource Management
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of human resource management. Topics include the nature of human resource management, staffing the organization, training and developing human resources, compensating strategies, employee relations and global HR.

    BUS 851 Management Information Systems
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to equip managers to plan, organize, direct, and control the information resources of the firm; to help them work effectively with computer personnel; to enable them to discriminate among software products; and to instill a sense of urgency to stay abreast of rapid changes in the field of information technology that affect the strategic positioning of their firm.

    BUS 860 Labor Economics
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with neoclassical labor theory and the issues surrounding the labor market in the U.S. Subject matter includes, among other topics, demand for labor, demand elasticities, quasi-fixed labor costs, supply of labor, household production, and compensating wage differentials.

    BUS 862 Current Economic Problems
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a knowledge of current problems in the economy. The subject matter of this course changes as economic issues change. Readings include publications of the Federal Reserve System, The National Association of Business Economists, as well as The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Fortune, Business Week, National Review, Conservative Chronicles, and others.

    BUS 863 Government Regulation
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the major aspects of antitrust, economic, and social regulations as it relates to the firm. Subject matter includes, among other topics, the philosophy of regulation, consumer benefits, capture theory, public choice theory, airline regulation, energy regulation, job safety regulation, environmental regulation, and antitrust regulation.

    BUS 870 International Operations
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to equip the student with an understanding of issues and firm strategy when a firm competes internationally. Subject matter includes country factors, global trade and investment environment, global monetary system, and strategy and structure of international business operations.

    BUS 883 Healthcare Systems and Policy
    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of major trends, issues, and problems confrontinghealthcare professionals and policy makers. Subject matter includes, among other topics, evolution of healthcare systems and policy, nursing issues, healthcare system reform, financing healthcare, managing healthcare costs, peer review organizations, and long-term care for the elderly.

    BUS 890 Independent Research
    (2-4 credits)
    Selected students will be permitted to complete a maximum of 4 credits of independent studies (two 2-credit electives or one 4-credit elective). Guidance and supervision on individual research work will be provided by members of the graduate faculty.

    EVALUATION AND DUE PROCESS

    Graduate students are expected to maintain sufficient progress toward a degree. Any student not showing promise of completing a program in a reasonable amount of time and whose academic performance is less than a 3.0 may be advised to withdraw from the University. Evaluation of student performance and progress will be monitored by the Director in consultation with the other members of the permanent graduate faculty. A review of each student’s performance will be made on a continuing basis. Unfavorable review can lead to warning or to probationary status, which can be removed after sufficient academic progress. Continual unfavorable academic performance can lead to removal of the student from the program. The Graduate Review Committee (the Director and two permanent graduate faculty members) may require a student to take specific actions to resolve an unfavorable situation, such as requiring a student to bring up his or her overall QPA average to 3.0 within the next two terms, or doing further study in an area of weakness.

    Should a student disagree with the decisions of the Director and/or the Graduate Review Committee, he or she may appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

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