• Graduate Catalog


  • Master of Science in Education and Master of Science in Educational Administration



    THE GRADUATE FACULTY

    DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW PURPOSE:

    “Leadership” is a way of thinking about education; the ability to anticipate, cope with, respond to, or initiate change effectively in the schools.

    In keeping with the rich Catholic tradition of Franciscan University of Steubenville, the Education Department accepts the responsibility of preparing quality educators for the 21st century. The department is confident that it is prepared to meet the challenge of training educators who possess the skills and abilities deemed necessary to be master teachers and leaders.

    The University has been proactive in its approach to education. The Education Department realizes the significance and importance of having educators prepared to exercise leadership qualities and abilities in their present position and/or positions they are seeking. Therefore, the MS in Education Program’s curriculum was developed to provide a holistic perspective of education by emphasizing curriculum, instruction, leadership, and the classroom teaching environment. The department’s approach to an integrated curriculum is through interdepartmental/ interdisciplinary collaboration and team teaching. The integrated curriculum affords each individual the opportunity of strengthening personal, intellectual, interpersonal, and spiritual growth.

    The Master of Science in Educational Administration and Master of Science in Education share the same organizing theme: developing educators who possess leadership abilities and qualities.

    The Core Area is common to both master’s degree programs. It is imperative that students are well grounded in philosophical foundations and research skills to be informed educators.

    The Concentration Area exposes students to contemporary content-based course work. The designated courses provide an in-depth view of all facets of education, expanding the student’s academic knowledge base, encouraging independent thought, and aiding the development of professional growth. The courses in the concentration are vital to the development of teacher leaders who are to become effective change agents and share in the achievement of organizational goals.

    Ultimately, the curriculum, preparing teachers as leaders, is designed to prepare the individual to grow intellectually and spiritually, to share in the achievement of organizational goals, to function more effectively within the classroom environment, and to operate effectively and efficiently regardless of the designated role within the organization.

    PHILOSOPHY

    The basic philosophy of the Master of Science in Education and the Master of Science in Educational Administration is to impart to its students knowledge in academic fields, special skills in research, and sharpened powers of independent thought. The program is designed to de- velop individuals who exercise leadership qualities to improve their effectiveness in education both personally and professionally, regardless of the area of emphasis, i.e., supervisor, elementary principal, secondary principal, assistant superintendent, or superintendent.

    The purposes and objectives of the Master of Science in Education are in keeping with Franciscan University of Steubenville’s mission as well as being responsive to the interests and needs of teachers. The faculty and administration who support the Master of Science in Educational Administration express compatibility of the program with the mission, goals, and convictions of Franciscan University of Steubenville.

    The graduate program, through its faculty, seeks to create and maintain the academic milieu for excellence in graduate work. Therefore, its influence and encouragement extend first to its own members and their scholarly activities. Educators completing the Franciscan University of Steubenville Master of Science in Educational Administration Program are individuals who bring to their position knowledge in academic fields, special skills in research, sharpened powers of thought, and leadership abilities and qualities that include life long learning skills, problem solving, appropriate decision making, maturation, coping abilities, responsibility, interpersonal skills, and effective time management. Yet, while the program gives them the resources, the guidance, and the inspiration of a scholarly staff in its classrooms, laboratories, and libraries, it expects the students themselves to bring marked initiative and energies to their work and to assume full responsibility for the progress of their studies.

    In short, graduate work, for the student at Franciscan University of Steubenville, has for its purpose an integrated program of advanced study based on adequate undergraduate preparation in a specific field. It presupposes academic and personal maturity and makes more than an average demand upon the initiative, the industry, and the scholarship of the candidate for an advanced degree.

    Men and women graduates of approved colleges or universities who hold the bachelor’s degree are eligible for admission. Applicants must have had adequate undergraduate preparation in their proposed fields of study and must show satisfactory promise for pursuing higher studies.

    Franciscan University of Steubenville accepts into its graduate program applicants who can present undergraduate records showing them capable of meeting the standards of graduate work. An applicant must hold a teacher’s certificate or a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, unless specific exceptions are granted, i.e., individual departmental evaluations by the Director of graduate education, and must have attained an undergraduate quality point average of at least 2.5 of a possible 4.0.

    PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE COMPLETION

    To qualify for a degree, a student will:

    1. Fulfill the Core Program requirements.
    2. Complete the requirements of the concentration according to the quantity and quality required of the Master of Science in Educational Administration and the Master of Science in Education degrees.
    3. Earn a minimum of 36 credit hours (MS Educational Administration or MS Education) including core and concentration requirements, with the necessary quality point average (3.0 minimum).
    4. File an application for graduation with the Registrar before anticipated completion of the degree.
    5. Attend, evaluate, and critique two graduate-level Exit Conferences.
    6. Successfully complete the required Departmental Exit Conference.

    MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION



    ADMINISTRATOR SPECIALIST LICENSECentral Office/Supervisory Capacity

    CURRICULUM INSTRUCTION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
    Requirements:
    1. Area of concentration
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Two years of teaching underprofessional Teacher License
    4. Completion of State Board of Education examination
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
      or
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership
    • EDU 513 Models of Teaching
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I (emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project (on a topic in area of concentration)
    • EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues and the School Administrator

    ADMINISTRATOR SPECIALIST LICENSE

    Central Office/Supervisory CapacityRequirements:
    • EDU 601 Early Childhood Administration
    • EDU 603 Elementary and Middle School Administration
    • EDU 605 SecondarySchoolAdministration
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planning for School Management (Planned Field Experience II emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)

    EDUCATIONAL STAFF/PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATOR

    Requirements:
    1. Area of concentration
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Two years of teaching under professional teacher license
    4. Completion of State Board of Education examination
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
      or
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I (emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project (on a topic in area of concentration)
    • EDU 603 Elementary and Middle School Administration
      or
    • EDU 605 Secondary School Administration
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel & Public Relations
    • EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues & the School Administrator

    ADMINISTRATOR SPECIALIST LICENSE


    Central Office/Supervisory Capacity
    Requirements:
    • EDU 603 Elementary & Middle School Administration
      or
    • EDU 605 Secondary School Administration
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
      or
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planning for School Management (Planned Field Experience II emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)

    SCHOOL/COMMUNITY RELATIONS

    Requirements:
    1. Area of concentration
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Two years of teaching under professional teacher license
    4. Completion of State Board of Education examination
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
      or
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 541 School & Society
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I (emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project (on a topic in area of concentration)
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel & Public
    • Relations EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues & the School Administrator

    ADMINISTRATOR SPECIALIST LICENSE

    Central Office/Supervisory CapacityRequirements:
    • EDU 603 Elementary and Middle School Administration
    • EDU 605 Secondary School Administration
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planning for School Management (Planned Field Experience II emphasizes competencies in area of concentration)

    PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATOR LICENSE PRINCIPAL: AGES 3-14

    Requirements:

    Must hold one of the following: Early Childhood, Middle School, Multi-age, or Intervention Specialist License

    1. Area of concentration
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Completion of State Board of Education examination
    4. Successful completion of Entry Year Program for participants
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project
    • EDU 601 Early Childhood Administration
    • EDU 603 Elementary & Middle School Administration
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel & Public Relations
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planned Field Experience II

    PRINCIPAL: AGES 8-21

    Requirements:

    Must hold one of the following: Middle School, Multi-age, or Intervention Specialist, Adolescence to Young Adult License or Vocational License

    1. Area of concentration
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Completion of State Board of Education examination
    4. Successful completion of Entry Year Program for participants
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    • EDU 508 Computers in EducationalLeadership
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project
    • EDU 603 Elementary & Middle School Administration
    • EDU 605 Secondary School Administration
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel and Public Relations
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planned Field Experience II

    SUPERINTENDENT LICENSE

    Requirements:
    1. Principal or administrative specialist license
    2. Good moral character/recommended by dean or chair of Education Department
    3. Three years of successful experience in a position requiring a principal or administrative specialist license
    4. Successful completion of required courses
    5. Completion of examination prescribed by State Board of Education
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    • EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
      or
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    • EDU 511 Curriculum
    • EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership
    • EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project
    • EDU 603 Elementary & Middle School Administration
    • EDU 605 SecondarySchoolAdministrator
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel & Public Relations
    • EDU 615 School Law I
    • EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    • EDU 621 Planned Field Experience II
    • EDU 715 School Law II
    • EDU 716 Business Affairs & Physical Resources
    • EDU 718 The Superintendency
    • EDU 722 Collective Bargaining & Contract Management
    • EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues & the School Administrator

    MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

    CURRICULUM

    CORE REQUIREMENTS
    (9 semester hours)
    • EDU 502 Philosophical Studies (3 credits)
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology (3 credits)
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project (3 credits)
    CONCENTRATION
    (15 semester hours)
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education (3 credits)
    • EDU 511 Curriculum (3 credits)
    • EDU 513 Models of Teaching (3 credits)
    • EDU 539 Computers in Education (3 credits)
    • EDU 541 School and Society (3 credits)
    ELECTIVES (12 semester hours)
    • EDU 505 Educational Leadership (3 credits)
    • EDU 506 The Student and Deviant Behavior (3 credits)
    • EDU 509 Supervision (3 credits)
    • EDU 510 Instructional Leadership (3 credits)
    • EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership (3 credits)
    • EDU 514A Individual Study in Administration (1-3 credits)
    • EDU 514E Individual Study in Education (1-3 credits)
    • EDU 515 Prehistoric Archaeological Field School for Educators (3 credits)
    • EDU 516 Historical Archaeological Field School for Educators (3 credits)
    • EDU 517 Trends and Issues in Social Studies (3 credits)
    • EDU 518 An Integrated Approach to Social Studies and Science (3 credits)
    • EDU 519 Science Education (3 credits)
    • EDU 520 Teaching Great Books (3 credits)
    • EDU 525 The Catholic Educator: Vision and Strategies (3 credits)
    • EDU 536 Phonics (3 credits)
    • EDU 536ST Special Topics in Education (3 credits)
    • EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education (3 credits)
    • EDU 543 Literature for Children and Adolescents (3 credits)
    • EDU 545 Advanced Developmental Reading (3 credits)
    • EDU 546 Research in Reading Instruction (3 credits)*
    • EDU 547 Diagnosing of Reading Difficulties (3 credits)*
    • EDU 548 Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties (3 credits)*
    • EDU 554 Reading in the Content Areas (3 credits)*
    • EDU 601 Early Childhood Administration (3 credits)
    • EDU 603 Elementary & Middle School Administration (3 credits)
    • EDU 605 Secondary School Administration (3 credits)
    • EDU 607 Staff Personnel & Public Relations (3 credits)
    • EDU 615 School Law I (3 credits)
    • EDU 617 School Finance & Economics (3 credits)
    • EDU 715 School Law II (3 credits)
    • EDU 718 The Superintendency (3 credits)
    • EDU 722 Collective Bargaining(3 credits)
    • EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues and the School Administrator (3 credits)

    * EDU 545 is a prerequisite for this course.

    + Prerequisite course for EDU 615

    MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AND READING TEACHER*/ENDORSEMENT ELECTIVES

    CORE REQUIREMENTS
    (9 semester hours)
    • EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    • EDU 570 Master’s Project
    CONCENTRATION
    (15 semester hours)
    • EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    ELECTIVES
    • EDU 509 Supervision
    • EDU 520 Teaching Great Books
    • EDU 536 Phonics
    • EDU 543 Literature for Children and Adolescents
    • EDU 545 Advanced Developmental Reading +
    • EDU 546 Research in ReadingInstruction +
    • EDU 547 Diagnosing of Reading Difficulties +
    • EDU 548 Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties +
    • EDU 554 Reading in the ContentAreas
    READING TEACHER ENDORSEMENT ONLY
    • EDU 509 Supervision (for Reading Supervision Positions)
    • EDU 520 Teaching Great Books
    • EDU 543 Literature for Children and Adolescents
    • EDU 545 Advanced Developmental Reading
    • EDU 546 Research in Reading Instruction+
    • EDU 547 Diagnosing of Reading Difficulties+
    • EDU 548 Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties+
    • EDU 554 Reading in the Content Areas+
    • EDU 536 Phonics is required for the endorsement.

    Requires completion of an examination prescribed by the State Board of Education The endorsement of a standard certificate in Ohio validates the student to teach and supervise reading in the certification of licensure area. West Virginia requires the Master’s Degree with the Reading Concentration for the Reading Specialist.

    +EDU 545 is a prerequisite for these courses.

    EMPLOYED GRADUATE STUDENTS

    Fully employed graduate students may register for no more than six credit hours each semester. Students may register for three credit hours during Maymester and nine credit hours in the first (June-July) and the second summer (July-August) sessions. (Full-time graduate students may enroll in nine (9) credit hours in the fall and spring semesters.)

    ACADEMIC STANDING

    In order to qualify for graduation, a student must achieve an average of at least 3.0 (B) in all work undertaken for the degree.

    READING ENDORSEMENT PROGRAM

    The Reading Endorsement Program for Franciscan University of Steubenville graduate students provides a strong theoretical background in reading along with instructional methods and materials necessary to apply theoretical principles. The program realizes and emphasizes the interrelatedness of the language arts in theory, practical application, and diagnostic procedures.

    The graduate student will be given the opportunity to organize, manage, and evaluate the reading-language processes through the clinical and field-based components of the program. The culminating course, Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties, provides a closely supervised experience in which the graduate student studies and uses informal and formal diagnostic techniques. The students implement an entire clinical reading experience for young children, assessing and evaluating to implement appropriate instruction for all students.

    The Reading Endorsement Program seeks to develop individuals who possess leadership qualities and abilities through an integrated program of advanced study. The course work reflects the abilities, qualities, and skills that are indicative of effective leaders in reading as well as all areas of education.

    FINGERPRINTS/ BACKGROUND CHECKS

    Applicants for any State of Ohio teaching and/or administrative license as well as applicants to the teacher education program and applicants to student teaching must have their fingerprints taken according to the following instructions:

    BCI Civilian Background Check:

    Effective April 30, 2007, all BCI background checks must be done through the use of WebCheck.This may be done locally at the Jefferson County Educational Service Center (across the street from McDonald’s on Sunset Boulevard). You must have the correct change (cash only) and have a driver’s license or State ID.You do not need an appointment. Hours are Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m. BCI only $30; FBI only $35; BCI and FBI $65

    Results should be back in one to two weeks.

    Graduate students who are already working in the schools may have their background check done at their local school district office.

    **BACKGROUND CHECKS ARE ONLY GOOD FOR ONE YEAR. AND ARE REQUIRED BY LAW FOR LICENSURE, AND ALSO FOR ALL STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE FIELD-BASED PROGRAM.

    PLACEMENT IN THE SCHOOLS WILL NOT BE DONE UNTIL THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT RECEIVES PROOF OF THE COMPLETION OF THE BACKGROUND CHECK.

    STATE OF OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

    ON DEVELOPING A DEFINITION OF GOOD MORAL CHARACTER

    Section 3319.30 of the Ohio Revised Code provides in pertinent part that “no person shall receive any compensation for the performance of duties as teacher...who has not obtained a certificate of qualification for the position...and which certificate shall further certify to the good moral character of the holder thereof....”

    Teacher education and certification standards adopted by the State Board of Education that became effective July 1, 1987, provide that individuals must be of “good moral character” to be admitted to a teacher preparation program and to be recommended for initial certification.

    Section 3319.31 of the Revised Code provides in pertinent part that the State Board of Education shall revoke the certificate of an individual “if at any time the holder of a certificate is found intemperate, immoral, incompetent, negligent, or guilty of other conduct unbecoming to his position” and whenever any person “pleads guilty to or is convicted of any felony, any violation of Section 2907.04 or 2907.06, or division (A) or (C) of Section 2907.07 of the Revised Code, any offense of violence, theft offense, or drug abuse offense that is not a minor misdemeanor, or any substantively comparable ordinance of a municipal corporation”...(or federal law).

    “As used in this section, ‘theft offense’ has the same meaning as in Section 2913.01 of the Revised Code, (and) ‘drug abuse offense’ has the same meaning as in Section 2925.01 of the Revised Code...” An offense of violence is defined in Section 2913.01 of the Revised Code.

    Since the State Board of Education shall revoke the certificate of any individual who pleads guilty to or is convicted of the offenses set forth above, it would seem that the absence of pleading guilty to or having been convicted of such an offense that has not been sealed or expunged should be considered to constitute “good moral character” for the purpose of admitting an individual to a teacher preparation program or recommending an individual for certification. Either of these requirements might be met by posing the same type of question as is asked on the application form for a teacher’s certificate.

    The “sealing of a record” is provided for by Section 2953.31 et seq of the Revised Code. Section 2953.33 provides for the restoration of rights and privileges of a person whose record has been sealed. It further provides that “a person may be questioned only with respect to convictions not sealed, unless the question bears a direct and substantial relationship to the position for which the person is being considered.”

    The “expungement of record after agreed bail forfeiture” is provided by Section 2953.42 of the Revised Code and Section 2953.42 of the Revised Code provides that “a person may not be questioned with respect to any record that has been expunged pursuant to Section 2953.42 of the Revised Code.”

    Any individual denied admission to a teacher preparation program or any individual not recommended for certification based on the issue of “good moral character” should be afforded the right to due process (the right to be heard) on such issue.

    DEPARTMENTAL EXIT CONFERENCE

    Degree-seeking candidates must participate in an Exit Conference. The following delineates the process that should assist in the preparation and deliverance of the Exit Conference.

    1. Near the completion of EDU 570 (Master’s Project), the student will prepare for the Exit Conference.
    2. Students in EDU 570 will be assigned a graduate faculty member to assist in coordinating the Exit Conference.
    3. The Exit Conference shall be of approximately 40 minutes in dura- tion. An additional 10 minutes will be provided for questions from the audience.
    4. Each student in the graduate program shall be required to attend a minimum of two Exit Conferences other than his/her own before grad- uation.
    5. The Graduate Education Department will advertise the Exit Conferences (fliers, posters, etc.) on the Graduate Education bulletin board and in the Graduate Education Newsletter.
    6. Students may invite family members, fellow students, and graduate faculty to attend the Exit Conferences.
    7. A sign-in sheet shall be circulated by the assigned advisor (graduate faculty) in order to record attendance to meet the requirements in #4.
    8. The arrangements and/or decision to serve coffee, tea, punch, and so on following the Exit Conference shall be left to the discretion of the students.
    9. An evaluation of the Exit Conference shall be made by the assigned graduate faculty (advisor) member. The evaluation shall be reviewed with the student and placed in the student’s cumulative file.
    10. The Exit Conference is a professional presentation. Projections, handouts, and other materials that will convey clarity to the audience will be available upon request.

    EDU 570 is a culminating course for each graduate student and in this respect enables the student to demonstrate qualities of mind, persistence, habits of organization, and the ability to apply knowledge well beyond the confines of Franciscan University of Steubenville. The Exit Conference gives focus to the graduate program by affirming for each student and for the larger community what has been learned in the graduate program and what skills have been developed in fulfilling the requirements for the Master of Science in Education and Educational Administration.

    GRADUATION

    To initiate the process of applying for graduation, students MUST notify the Graduate Education Office when they register for the term preceding their final term of study. The necessary forms and information will be processed to confirm that graduation requirements are satisfied. Students will be notified of discrepancies and/or acceptance for graduation.

    WORKSHOP CREDIT FOR DEGREE

    Students are reminded that no more than three semester hours of workshop credit may be applicable toward the master’s degree. A workshop has a course number followed by a W.

    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

    Men and women graduates of approved colleges or universities who hold a bachelor’s degree are eligible for admission. Applicants must have had adequate undergraduate preparation in their proposed fields of study and must show satisfactory promise for pursuing higher studies.

    The Department of Education accepts into its graduate program applicants who can present undergraduate records showing them capable of meeting the standards of graduate work. An applicant:

    1. must hold a teacher’s certificate or a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution (at least state accreditation),unless specific exceptions are granted by the Director of graduate education
    2. Must have attained an undergraduate quality point average of at least 2.5 of a possible 4.0.

    An exception to the latter requirement may be made if the recommendation is endorsed by the Graduate Committee (see page 55). If the exception is granted, the applicant will be placed on conditional status, pending the successful completion of approximately nine to 12 hours.

    All applicants must submit references from qualified professionals in appropriate fields.

    An applicant who is NOT a graduate of Franciscan University Of Steubenville must submit complete OFFICIAL transcripts (i.e., the transcript MUST be stamped with the seal of the institution and not marked as “Issued to Student”) of all previous college studies. These transcripts should be sent directly to the Director of graduate education from the degree granting institution.

    Admission to graduate study on a regular, special, or conditional status does not imply admission to candidacy for a degree.

    CANDIDACY

    A student becomes a candidate for the Master’s degree in education if the cumulative quality point average for graduate work and the reference appraisals are judged to be acceptable. The most important consideration in the admission of a student to candidacy is the graduate work to date. Evidence of being able to meet all the graduation requirements must be given. Applicants who are deemed unqualified at this point will be advised to discontinue their program.

    Students should apply for admission to candidacy after the completion of approximately eighteen (18) semester hours of graduate work, including at least two (2) courses in the area of concentration. Application is made by filing the official candidacy form with the Director of graduate education or the administrative assistant. The applicant should meet with the advisor to be sure that all the required credentials are in order.

    NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY

    Franciscan University of Steubenville admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, handicap, and sex, to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, handicap, sex, age, religion, political affiliation, or socioeconomic status in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

    BACKGROUND COURSES

    EDU 560, Planned Field Experience, cannot be taken concurrently with EDU 503, Educational Research Methodology, or EDU 570, Master’s Project. EDU 503, Educational Research Methodology, is a prerequisite to EDU 570, Master’s Project. A majority of reading course work must be taken, including phonics, before enrolling in EDU 548, Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties. Students enrolled in the Master of Science in Education and/or Educational Administration are advised to complete 24 hours of their educational coursework prior to enrollment in EDU 503 and EDU 570. This will enable students to select worthwhile education topics for their master’s project.

    TRANSFER CREDIT

    Courses considered for transfer will be decided by the Director of graduate education in consultation with the Dean of the Faculty. Only courses taken before entry into the Master’s Program will be considered for transfer, and the request for transfer must be submitted to the Director of graduate education no later than the end of the first semester of studies at Franciscan University.

    TRANSCRIPTS

    Transcripts may be ordered from the Registrar’s Office. The cost is $2 each.

    Requests for transcripts should be addressed to:

    • Office of the Registrar Starvaggi Hall

      Franciscan University Of Steubenville
      1235 University Boulevard Steubenville, OH 43952

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education
    (3 credits)
    This course willlook at what part of society was educated for what purpose, by what means, and with what assumptions at several vital junctures in history. It will require the student to examine the correlations between historical and philosophical trends and educational practices and outcomes. It will look at the relationship between power and learning and the evolution of our present educational systems.

    EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology
    (3 credits)
    In this course, students will learn how to conduct original research in educational settings. The course will begin with a general discussion of the assumptions and procedures of educational research. Then, students will examine specific experimental and non-experimental designs commonly used by educational researchers. Students will discuss the assumptions and operations of descriptive and inferential statistics that are used to analyze research results. Finally, students will develop a research proposal that will express clearly and precisely his or her own research plans. Research proposal forms MUST be approved by the academic advisor in advance of EDU 503.

    THIS IS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 570.

     

    EDU 504 Human Development and Education
    (3 credits)
    A study and critical review of contemporary developmental theories such as those of Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson with interpretations made for teaching methodology.

    EDU 505 Educational Leadership
    (3 credits)
    The basic focus of this course shall be on the leadership within schools and the role of the leader in maintaining and/or bringing about change within the school system.

    EDU 506 The Student and Deviant Behavior
    (3 credits)
    The content of the course affords individuals the opportunity to exercise the emotional, mental, and physical handicapping conditions (psychological, sociological, physiological) causing the students to deviate, temporarily or permanently, from established expectations of normal behavior.

    EDU 508 Computers in Educational Leadership
    (3 credits)
    Through this course, administrators will develop the leadership skills to achieve computer-related instructional and administrative goals. Administrators will survey instructional applications such as CAI, tools, multimedia and programming; will study administrative applications, such as student scheduling and record-keeping, business applications, and personal productivity tools; and will gain insights into faculty/staff training and facility planning.

    EDU 509 Supervision
    (3 credits)
    This course in the theory and practice of supervision is designed to explore essential concepts and skills necessary in providing leadership in the improvement of teaching and learning. Emphasis will be placed on concepts and means of providing leadership in the supervisory task areas.

    EDU 509 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 510.

    EDU 510 Instructional Leadership
    (3 credits)
    Course focus is on developing skills and attitudes essential in helping others to expand/refine their instructional effectiveness. Activities include helping teachers use alternative models of teaching, diagnosing learner needs, prescribing appropriate student learning approaches, and utilizing observational data.

    EDU 509 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 510.

    EDU 511 Curriculum
    (3 credits)
    This course addresses the leadership role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. The course focuses on the impacting aspects of curriculum leadership, such as the history of curriculum development; importance of curriculum; the politics of curriculum; roles various parties play in curriculum; the importance to curriculum of the learner; knowledge, and the needs of society. Current issues in curriculum are part of the course, as are such practical skills as curriculum mapping and curriculum alignment. Lastly, the course is intended to motivate students regarding role and potential of their role in curriculum leadership.

    EDU 510 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 511.

    EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership
    (3 credits)
    This course requires the synthesizing of research on leadership principles as these principles pertain to the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. Secondly, the course will provide problem-solving opportunities for students to address some of the concerns facing the development and implementation of curriculum with particular reference to current curriculum issues and trends. Lastly, the course is meant to serve as a stimulus to help students integrate and organize knowledge bases in the area of curriculum.

    EDU 511 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 512

    EDU 513 Models of Teaching
    (3 credits)
    This course provides an analysis and experimentation with various models of teaching that can be useful in studying classroom interaction and evaluating teaching-learning performance.

    EDU 514 Individual Study in Education/Educational Administration
    (3 credits)
    This course is intended to provide an opportunity for graduate students to explore topics that are of interest or concern to them but that might not be covered in a regular course in Education/Administration. The choice of one to three semester hours is given so the student can explore the topic in more or less depth as his or her needs dictate.

    EDU 515 Prehistoric Archaeology Field School for Educators
    (3 credits)
    The purpose of this program is to develop a teaching unit in Prehistoric Archaeology. The teaching unit will include verbal discussions and color slides on the following topics:

    1. Prehistoric Archives Review;
    2. Prehistoric Literature Searches;
    3. Prehistoric Site Preparation;
    4. Site Surface Surveying;
    5. Site Test Excavation Methods;
    6. Site and Feature Mapping Techniques;
    7. Excavation Interpretations;
    8. Artifact and Ecofact Recordation;
    9. Volumetric Soil Sampling and Analytical Methods;
    10. Preliminary Laboratory Data Processing and Analyses.

    EDU 516 Historic Archaeology Field School for Educators
    (3 credits)
    The purpose of this program is to develop a teaching unit in historic archaeology. The teaching unit will include verbal discussions and color slides on the following topics:

    1. Historical Archives Review;
    2. Historical Literature Searches;
    3. Historic Site Preparation;
    4. Site Surface Surveying;
    5. Site Test Excavation Methods;
    6. Site and Feature Mapping Techniques;
    7. Excavation Interpretations;
    8. Artifact and Ecofact Recordation;
    9. Volumetric Soil Sampling and Analytical Methods;
    10. Preliminary Laboratory Data Processing and Analyses.

    EDU 517 Trends and Issues in Social Studies
    (3 credits)
    Trends and issues are examined that influence a social studies program, philosophy, curriculum, and methodology.

    EDU 518 An Integrated Approach to Social Studies and Science
    (3 credits) This course entails how to design a fused curriculum emphasizing the social studies and science content areas.

    EDU 519 Science Education
    (3 credits)
    A content course in science designed to prepare the elementary student teacher to effectively perform all teaching tasks associated with the teaching of elementary school science. Emphasis is placed upon laboratory techniques and the scientific method of solving problems.

    EDU 520 Teaching Great Books
    (3 credits)
    This course is intended to prepare teachers to develop the seminar approach to lead discussions of the major ideas of world culture with high school students grades 9 to 12. The primary tool will be important works of literature, philosophy, and science that have stood the test of time and become important cultural influences.

    EDU 525 The Catholic Educator: Vision and Strategies
    (3 credits)
    Designed to promote and enrich a student’s own quest to integrate being a Catholic and being an educator. We will initiate a dialogue between the contemporary situation in education and the Catholic heritage, identifying central elements, values, and attitudes in each. This dialogue will allow us to thematize a personal vision and to generate practical strategies for incarnating this vision in our lives as Catholic educators.

    EDU 536 PHONICS
    (3 credits)
    This course seeks to equip teachers to understand the linguistic principles underlying the process of learning to read, so that they might develop their own strategies to facilitate that process. Before studying specific methods of phonics instruction, students will first learn the physiology of the vocal mechanism (phonetics), conventions of representing sounds in writing (phonography), and the history of language development, so that they might easily adapt to any “system” of phonics instruction. Because it is the scientific principles behind word formation that are studied, and not simply the code-cracking process of early readers, this material can be applied at any level of instruction, K-12 and beyond.

    EDU 536ST Special Topics in Education
    (3 credits)
    Issues of current national or regional interest to teachers (i.e., accountability, testing of teachers, etc.) are studied.

    EDU 539 Computers in Education
    (3 credits)
    Through this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills needed to effectively use computers to enhance instruction. Topics include word processing, spreadsheets, database, electronic gradebooks, LogoWriter, multimedia, and classroom management. Educators will develop teaching, critical thinking, planning, problem-solving, and lifelong learning skills.

    EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education
    (3 credits)
    Through this course educators will continue to develop teaching, critical thinking, problem-solving, research, and communication skills. Course topics include instructional assessment, research, multimedia, Hypercard, telecommunications, and a continued in-depth study of LogoWriter.

    EDU 541 School and Society
    (3 credits)
    This course focuses on four areas:

    1. the concept and practice of equal opportunity;
    2. the ways in which America’s public schooling deals with human diversity;
    3. the concept of ideology and its implications for the curriculum; and
    4. the influence of the bureaucratic structure of schools on decision making, specifically with the problems of whom the schools should serve.

    EDU 543 Literature for Children and Adolescents
    (3 credits)
    A study of children’s books to develop critical and ethical standards for judgment. Guidance is given in selection of books for specific needs, interests, and reading abilities in eight genres and in instructional techniques for use in the classroom. Preschool through senior high school levels are covered.

    EDU 545 Advanced Developmental Reading
    (3 credits)
    The psychological and sociological basis in reading is covered in this course, with attention to linguistics, materials, skills, literature, and evaluation. This first course is designed to prepare specialists in reading.

    THIS IS A PREREQUISITE FOR OTHER COURSES IN THE READING SEQUENCE.

    EDU 546 Research in Reading Instruction
    (3 credits)
    This is a basic course for teachers concerned with the psychology of learning reading and with current problems and trends in reading and children’s literature.

    EDU 547 Diagnosing of Reading Difficulties
    (3 credits)
    Students in this course study and use informal and formal diagnostic tools for determining reading levels for remedial or advanced reading skills.

    EDU 548 Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties
    (3 credits)
    A supervised practicum experience (two hours daily; five weeks) in which clinicians will develop an individualized reading program for no more than two students. Each clinician will plan, diagnose, implement ,and evaluate the students, hold conferences, and prepare exit reports for the children for whom they are responsible.

    EDU 554 Reading in the Content Areas
    (3 credits)
    This course offers a study of reading problems and techniques for teaching vocabulary and reading skills in various content areas. Clinical experience (eight hours); plus field experience for secondary education majors.

    EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I
    (3 credits)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to experience supervisory/ administrative responsibilities in a supervised, planned, personalized program. The course work is designed to have the student execute 12 administrative proficiencies dealing with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC Standards). The student will work with a practicing school administrator who will guide, direct, and evaluate the student’s attainment of the proficiencies selected for the experiences. A graduate education faculty member will be assigned to the student to supervise the total experience and arrange for individual and two group meetings throughout the semester. The student will complete a minimum of 150 hours of fieldwork through the completion of EDU 560.

    EDU 570 Master’s Project
    (3 credits)
    The Master’s Project is a research project well grounded in the degree being sought, Educational Administration or Education. Four mandatory group meetings will focus on:

    1. Review of the project progress made through completion of the prerequisite course, EDU 503.
    2. ReportanddiscussiondealingwithChapter 4 of the Master’s Project-Results.
    3. Report and discussion with Chapter 5 of the Master’s Project-Discussion Conclusions, Implications, and Recomendations.
    4. Report and discussion of finalized Master’s Project and preparation for the scheduled exit conference.

    Other class meetings shall be arranged with the assigned professor.

    Prerequisite: EDU 503

     

    EDU 601 Early Childhood Administration
    (3 credits)
    Understanding child development, child management, and developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) for teaching young children (ages three to eight), will be the foundation for building leadership skills for early childhood administrators. Based on the foundation of understanding the child, there will be an emphasis on curriculum leadership, inclusion, licensure rules and regulations, parents and school relations, professional ethics, and personnel and staff development. Other administrative tasks and skills will be addressed as well as organizational planning and strategies for administering an early childhood program.

    EDU 603 Elementary and Middle School Administration
    (3 credits)
    Emphasis is placed on the application of the administering process as well as research on school effectiveness to the elementary and middle school setting. Focus will include administering the day-to-day operations and efforts designed to improve the total organization. Implementing operational plans, managing financial resources, and applying of decentralized management processes and procedures will receive major attention.

    EDU 605 Secondary School Administration
    (3 credits)
    The major objective of this course is to help students identify successful models of secondary school administration. This goal requires that students, through research, analysis, synthesis and decision making, arrive at a hypothetical model of an effective secondary school administrator. Secondly, the course develops an understanding of the principles involved in being a successful secondary administrator. Lastly, the course is meant to provide the student with sufficient insight to initially administer the day-to-day operation of a secondary school.

    EDU 607 Staff Personnel and Public Relations
    (3 credits)
    The purpose of this course is to evaluate the primary steps and procedures in an effective staff personnel program, namely, understanding the personnel function (planning, allocating, coordinating, influencing, and appraising), purposes of the personnel function, determining personnel needs, establishing a compensation structure, recruiting, selecting, inducting and in-servicing. Secondly, the course will identify the principles of a good school public relations program, establishing a master public relations plan, and working successfully with the media, parents, and public groups.

    EDU 615 School Law I
    (3 credits)
    This course addresses legal rights and responsibilities in the operation of public and non-public schools that are pertinent to teachers, administrators, students, and parents. The legal process, structures of the law, current legislation, litigation, and practices to avoid legal infringements are addressed. Primary emphasis is on the role and function of teachers and administrators at the building level.

    EDU 617 School Finance and Economics
    (3 credits)
    Principles of school finance, the economics of school finance, technical problems of budgeting, sources of income for schools, purchasing, accounting, debt service, and forms and formulas used in Ohio for the funding of schools, local taxes, and financial reports are all discussed.

    EDU 621 Planned Field Experience II (Planning for School Management)
    (3 credits)
    This course extends experiences gained through prerequisite course (EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I) and provides opportunities for the student to experience supervisory/administrative responsibilities in a supervised, planned, personalized program. The course is designed to have the student execute 12 administrative proficiencies dealing with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC Standards). The proficiencies are designed for limited and sustained participation. The student will work with a practicing administrator who will guide, direct, and evaluate the student’s attainment of the advanced proficiencies selected for the experiences. A graduate education faculty member will be assigned to the student to supervise the total experience and arrange for individual and two group meetings throughout the semester. The student will complete a minimum of 150 hours of fieldwork through the completion of EDU 621.

    Prerequisite: EDU 560

    EDU 715 School Law II
    (3 credits)
    This course deals with the law as it relates to the operation of the school district and the political structures in which the school district exists. A study of the statutes, judicial decisions, and opinions of the Attorneys General on both the state and federal levels will be emphasized. In addition, the course will include a study of the responsibilities and the legal authority of boards of education, administrators, teachers, and other school employees.

    EDU 716 Business Affairs and Physical Resources
    (3 credits)
    This course provides the student an opportunity to gain an overview of the business responsibilities that contribute to the effective running of a school system. It stresses the generalist characteristics required of the person responsible for the school system’s business affairs and gives particular emphasis to physical resources. Particular importance is placed on the skills of the person(s) in charge of school business affairs, namely: problem solving, conflict management, flexibility, creative thinking, prioritizing, accepting challenges, handling crises, effective communications within the system, honesty, and a host of other professional, personal, and interpersonal abilities required to effectively lead the business affairs and physical resources division. All the various departments of the school system, either directly or indirectly, require competent, efficient leadership from the business affairs division to promote their own effectiveness. This course studies the work of the business affairs division of a school system from “a service to other divisions” point of view.

    EDU 718 The Superintendency
    (3 credits)
    This course deals with understanding the duties and responsibilities of the modern-day superintendent, who is viewed as the leader of the school system. Particular emphasis is placed on the forces in the organization, in the environment, and within the human system that influence the superintendency.

    EDU 722 Collective Bargaining and Contract Management
    (3 credits)
    This course requires a study and understanding of the views of teacher associations or unions and boards of education (through their superintendent or personal negotiator) regarding the processes and procedures of collective bargaining. Secondly, the course promotes an understanding of the procedures of living within a negotiated agreement on the part of teachers and administrators. A study of the complete collective bargaining process, from developing proposals to agreement or strike, including an intensive bargaining simulation of an actual agreement, are part of the course. Lastly, EDU 722 will consider such significant topics as: The desired skills on the part of board and teacher negotiators, how to handle negotiation breakdowns, and the anticipated changes in the collective bargaining process for the future.

    EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues and the School Administrator
    (3 credits)
    This course offers a comprehensive examination of the many varied proposals for restructuring schools today. Emphasis is given to the understanding of what can be achieved through particular restructuring efforts and of the role administrators can play to make such efforts succeed.

    EVALUATION AND DUE PROCESS

    Graduate students are expected to maintain sufficient progress toward a degree. At various intervals, at each registration period, and especially before acceptance to candidacy for the degree, the advisor and/ or graduate officials will discuss the rate and quality of progress with the student. Any student not showing promise of completing the program in a reasonable amount of time and whose academic performance is less than a 3.0 may be advised to withdraw from the University. The particular focus of each evaluation review is a judgment about whether a student is academically, personally, or professionally prepared to be considered as a candidate for the Master’s degree in Education or the Master’s degree in Educational Administration.

    More specifically, students will be evaluated on a continuous basis by the established criteria for each course in the program, i.e., examinations, clinical and field base participation, performance assessment, research endeavors, and course grades. The varied instructional strategies in the course work allows for performance evaluation. The clinical and field base components in designated courses serve as a testing ground for students to diagnose and solve problems that involve the application of principles and theories from the professional program.

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