• Exercise Science Minor

    Biology Department

    The Exercise Science minor is designed to give students an understanding of the human body and how it responds to exercise and injury at all stages of life. Courses are designed to give students an understanding of the physiological adaptations and benefits associated with exercise, common sports related injuries, and the science behind typical rehabilitation protocols. Students will gain knowledge regarding the benefits and drawbacks of different types of training and nutritional regimens as well as hands-on experience in a field of the students’ choosing: athletic training, coaching, research, personal training, or physical therapy. Of particular importance is the Exercise Science Practicum, a structured hands-on learning experience designed to complement and expand on the student's academic course work.

    The following courses would be required to earn the minor:
    BIO 133 Anatomy and Physiology I
    BIO 134 Anatomy and Physiology II
    BIO 215 Nutrition
    ESC 210 Introduction to Athletic Injuries
    ESC 220 Strength and Fitness Training and Assessment
    ESC 335/BIO 335 Exercise Physiology
    ESC 350 Exercise Science Practicum

    Biology majors can substitute BIO 230 Comparative Anatomy and BIO 427 Human Physiology for BIO 133 and 134.


    EXERCISE SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:


    ESC 210

    INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC INJURIES outlines and differentiates the basic types of injury sustained during fitness or sporting-related activities. Injured studies include muscular injuries, ligamentous injuries, fractures and dislocations, as well as closed-head injuries (concussions). Basic principles of management of these injuries will be developed, though course scope does not approach clinical management. Rather, a thorough understanding of the injury process, the tissues involved, and their typical healing times and response is the focus of IAI. Students also learn exercise principles in rehabilitation of athletic injuries and basic taping and splinting. Ability to search the current literature via online resources, evaluate strength of research (based on principles taught at the onset of ASEC), and presenting research concerning "Evidence-Based Practice" (EBP) will be included.
    Not for credit in Biology Major.
    Prerequisites: BIO 133 or BIO 122 and 123
    3 credit hours


    ESC 220

    STRENGTH AND FITNESS TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT covers skills, knowledge, techniques, and strategies specific to health and performance related to physical fitness. This is applicable to both personal fitness programs and educational settings. This course addresses the scientific basis of designing exercise programs for healthy individuals. Principles of overload, progression, and specificity are covered as well as intensity, frequency, duration, and mode. Various methods of training (endurance, interval, resistance, cross-training) are feathered. Ability to search the current literature via online resources, evaluate strength of research (based on principles taught at the onset of ASEC), and presenting research concerning "Evidence-Based Practice" (EBP) will be included.
    Not for credit in Biology Major.
    Prerequisites: BIO 133 or BIO 122 and 123
    3 credit hours


    ESC 335

    EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY is the study of the physiological adaptations the body makes to exercise stress. Topics include the principles of strength development, muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance development bioenergetics, energy expenditure, functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, real function, nutrition, weight control, and body composition. Lab exercises include body composition analysis, metabolic testing (O2 and CO2 measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise), cardiovascular kinetics during exercise (via HR and BP analysis). In addition, field-testing and submaximal cardiovascular testing for a general fitness population, basic muscular flexibility and basic muscular strength testing will be included. This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for the student intent on pursuing graduate studies in Exercise Physiology (EP) or Physical Therapy (PT).
    3 lecture hours with lab assignments.
    Cross-listed with BIO 335
    Prerequisites: BIO 133 and 134 or BIO 122 and 123
    3 credit hours


    ESC 350

    EXERCISE SCIENCE PRACTICUM is a structured hands-on ;earning experience designed to complement and expand on the student's academic course work. This course includes readings in related areas, written reports, and on-site supervision and evaluation, Students must spend a minimum of 50 hours doing practicum-related activities to earn the 1 credit associated with the practicum course. Possible practicum tracks include, but are not limited to, the following: A) Athletic Training Practicum: student will work part-time with an athletic trainer for a semester; B) Coaching Practicum: student will work part-time as assistant coaches at Franciscan University or local high schools for one season; C) Physical Therapy Practicum: student will assist and shadow a physical therapist for one semester; D) Personal Trainer Practicum: student will work part time as a personal trainer for a semester; E) Exercise Physiology Practicum: student will design and perform and independent research project. The outcomes will be presented to students and faculty in the program.
    Not for credit in Biology Major.
    Prerequisites: ESC 210, 220 or 301
    3 credit hours

FacebookTwitterFlickr LogoYouTube Logorss icons
 
MyFranciscan - Click here

GET CONNECTED!

Get Connected Picture  

Information
for Future:

Click here to log in
Click here to get help
Contact Us | Campus E-mail | Directions | Search | CALENDARS | Privacy Policy | MYFranciscan  | Nondiscrimination Statement
 

1235 University Blvd, Steubenville, Ohio 43952 | Main 740-283-3771 | Consumer Information © Franciscan University of Steubenville