• Psychology Classes


    PSY 105

    GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY presents a picture of the science of Psychology as it exists today. Factors that are characteristics of individuals in general are studied. These topics include the nervous system, emotions, perception, sensation, thinking, motivation, and personality development. Prerequisite for all Psychology courses. (Social Science Core)
    3 credit hours


    PSY 204

    PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS is based on the principle that a scientific study of man and his behavior requires the measurement and description of his behavior in an objective, systematic manner. This course introduces the student to the fundamental statistical techniques used in psychological research. These methods include sampling techniques, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation, and probability.
    Prerequisite: MTH 155 and PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 206

    PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I examines the physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of the child from birth through adolescence. Human development involves the study and critical review of the child development and the developmental theories of early and middle childhood, as well as those of adolescence and young adulthood. Knowledge of physiological, sociological, and psychological forces as they influence the behavior of the child and maturing adolescent are vital to the understanding of the human personality. This course also examines some of the problems involved in these phases of the development sequence. (Social Science Core)
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 207

    PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT II is a continuation of the study of human personality focusing on the psychological, physiological, and sociological forces as they influence maturity and decline in behavior during early, middle, and late adulthood. (Social Science Core)
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 208

    ADJUSTMENT recognizes the fresh insight of contemporary psychology into human behavior, such as new approaches for helping individuals overcome their problems and fulfill their personal potential. Through small group discussion and interpersonal encounter, students learn to cope with such problem areas and to discover personal potentials.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 209

    ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLGY examines the physical, cognitive, social, moral, religious, and personality development of the maturing adolescent. Knowledge of physiological, sociological, and psychological forces, as they influence the behavior of the adolescent, is vital to the understanding of the human personality. Some of the problems involved in this phase of the developmental sequence are also explored. (Social Science Core)
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 224

    SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY explores the growth of a social personality, the effects of crowd behavior, the development of values and attitudes, and the mechanics of group life in general. The recognized scholars Maslow, Goffman, Berger, Luckman, and others, are included in this study of the whole person.
    Cross listed with SOC 224; Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 275

    COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY is the understanding of the mental processes that one undergoes to understand the world, one another and to make a decision. This course will examine the cognitive means that accompany processes of memory, attention, categorization, logic, problem solving, reasoning, decision making, and speech development.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 301

    EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY emphasizes the psychological approach to learning, methods of evaluation, transfer of learning, training, developmental patterns of pupils, and teacher-student interaction, along with focus on language development. Although when compared to some other sciences, educational psychology is relatively young, the problems this course deals with are very old. Solutions to some of these problems are offered through the ideas of James, Thorndike, Watson, Skinner, Goddard, Bayler, Bruner, Piaget, Erikson, White, Marcia, Elkind, Gardner, Chomsky and others. Students will be given opportunities to engage in small group discussions as well as experiential exercises designed to bring to life the ideas of several of the educational theorists.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 304

    MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principals of multivariate statistical analysis. Possible topics to be covered include multivariate data screening, analysis of covariance, MANOVA, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling, factor analysis, profile analysis, path analysis, structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, and meta analysis.
    Prerequisite: PSY 204
    3 credit hours


    PSY 305

    INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY surveys the important and widespread applications of Psychology to industry and Business, involving many different areas of general Psychology. Some of these applications have been in the following areas: motivational research, evaluation and interviewing of employees, factors in adjustment, and efficiency in work such as employee morale, training, job evaluation, and fatigue.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 307-308

    EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I & II deal with scientific psychological experimentation as it consists in the following kinds of activities: the formulation and selection of a problem for investigation, making observations and collecting facts relevant to the problem, the processing and analysis of the facts, the explanation and analysis of data, and finally, the reporting and communication of conclusions. Class lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments enable the student to learn and apply the scientific method in psychological research. Include both lecture and lab hours.
    Prerequisite: PSY 204
    3 credit hours per semester


    PSY 309

    PERSONALITY investigates one of the most complex phenomena studied by Psychology. It is so because in our daily lives we continually meet and deal with other personalities, anticipate their actions, and understand their feelings. Personality theories that underlie the various approaches to psychotherapy are studied in this course. Among the theories examined are: Psycho analysis, behaviorism, cognitive-behaviorism, social learning, phenomenology, and existentialism.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 310

    MOTIVATION AND EMOTION builds upon the long history of interest in human motivation—why people behave in certain ways. This history can be traced from the early speculation of philosophers to the scientific research of contemporary psychologists. In this course, the student will survey the major philosophical points of view concerning motivation and will study intensively the work of psychologists interested in motivation. The student will also study emotion in this course. Emotions are linked closely to motivation because they influence the way people perceive and adapt to the world. Psychologists believe that emotions determine the quality of motivated behavior.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 318

    PERCEPTION is studied in an attempt to explain man’s observations of the world around him. Each man lives in his own world, for his world is determined by what and how he experiences it. By studying the sensory processes, the organization of visual and auditory experiences, and perceptual anomalies such as illusions, students gain a better understanding of “why things look as they do” to the perceiver.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 319

    INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING assists students in developing counseling skills through an analysis of contemporary models of counseling designed for behavior change or adjustment. Theories and rationale behind these counseling models will be presented with actual counseling case materials.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 320

    GROUP DYNAMICS discusses general principles of interaction in human relation situations. Through demonstration and participation, students learn to work effectively with groups and to achieve deeper self-understanding by employing the various group techniques used in personal, social, and emotional adjustment.
    Prerequisites: PSY 319
    3 credit hours


    PSY 322

    ADVANCED COUNSELING deals in further depth with many of the issues presented in the introductory counseling course. Emphasis will be placed on actual experience in counseling through extensive use of role-playing situations and actual counseling cases. Close supervision will give the opportunity for interaction with the instructor in the development of the student’s counseling skills.
    Prerequisite: PSY 319 or permission by instructor
    3 credit hours


    PSY 324

    HUMAN AND SPIRITUAL INTEGRATION is a seminar in contemporary psychology and Christian Humanism emphasizing the intimate and dynamic correlation of nature and grace. An interdisciplinary approach is designed to critically examine contemporary issues and areas of concern. Psychological perspectives on being human such as development, personality, motivation, value, psychopathology, addiction, and therapeutic interventions will be brought into dialogue with theological perspectives on human beings such as finitude, human nature, conversion, holiness, growth, vocation, and spirituality. The primary focus will be on developing skills for practical understanding and application.
    Cross listed with THE 324; Prerequisites: Completion of at least two courses in psychology and two courses in theology
    3 credit hours


    PSY 350

    FAMILY, GENDER AND SPIRITUAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING is designed to aid students in an understanding of issues related to family, gender, and spirituality. These three separate, yet integrated areas will be explored in the context of the counseling relationship. Topics may include an awareness of issues faced in marriages and by families, therapeutic interventions dealing with the issues and problems marriages and families face, issues of gender equality and differences as they influence marriage and family, healthy and unhealthy approaches to religion and how both affect therapeutic intervention, and a presentation of models of psychological intervention, specific treatment issues, and techniques from multiple theoretical orientations that can be utilized when working with religiously committed clients.
    Prerequisite: PSY 206
    3 credit hours


    PSY 351

    SPIRITUALITY IN THE HELPING PROFESSIONS allows students to examine their faith and enhance recognition of how it influences their lives and others that they will serve through their professions. It will help students to understand and provide guidelines for how to use Catholic SocialTeaching in their work with clients. It will also enhance awareness of other faith traditions and religions.
    (cross-listed with SWK 351); Prerequisite: PSY 105 or SWK 203
    3 credit hours


    PSY 401

    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY deals with the most fascinating of topics—the disorganized personality. It explores a wide variety of unusual human experiences ranging from minor maladjustments encountered in daily living to more severe disorders requiring hospitalization or prolonged treatment. Students gain an understanding of mental and emotional dysfunctions as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5, as well as etiologies, and treatment.
    Should be taken as a junior/senior course. Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 403

    PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS makes a principal distinction between modern scientific psychology and philosophical psychology through its emphasis on quantitative measurement as a means of acquiring knowledge about human behavior as contrasted to the speculative approach. To describe human abilities, psychologists have developed measures of intelligence, achievement, aptitudes, interest, and personality. This course examines these types of evaluation instruments and gives the student the opportunity to administer and interpret such tests.
    Should be taken as a junior/senior course; Prerequisite: PSY 204
    3 credit hours


    PSY 406

    BIOPSYCHOLOGY provides an introduction to the relationship of brain and hormones to psychological functioning. It will examine basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology important to behavior, and present the biological bases of motor movement, sleep, emotions, perception, memory, language, motivation and psychopathology.
    Prerequisite: BIO 133, BIO134 & PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 407-408

    INTERNSHIP aids students in improving their professional skills through a directed, extensive 150-hour experience in a psychological, psychiatric, mental health, or human services setting. Psychology majors may serve their internship as undergraduate research or teaching assistants.
    Prerequisite: Senior status
    3 credits per semester


    PSY 409

    INTERVIEWING AND ASSESSMENT studies the purpose, structure, and techniques of effective interviewing, history taking, and recording client data. Selected types of assessment techniques are also presented.
    Prerequisite: PSY 105
    3 credit hours


    PSY 434*

    THESIS requires senior majors to write a thesis on an approved psychological topic. The thesis will primarily involve library research. Guidance and supervision will be provided by a departmental faculty member.
    Prerequisite: Senior status
    1 credit hour


    PSY 435*

    COORDINATING SEMINAR is a formal presentation of an extensively researched and approved topic of psychological interest.
    1 credit hour

    *Senior majors must choose either PSY 434 Thesis or PSY 435 Coordinating Seminar to complete their major course requirements for graduation.



  • Social Work Classes


    SWK 203

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK introduces the student to the profession of social work, its history, philosophy, values and ethics, and fields of practice. The course also explains the relationship between social work and social welfare. Special focus is given to cultural and human diversity and at-risk populations that social workers serve and why social workers promote social and economic justice. The course also addresses the ethical code of conduct for social workers and its implications for social work practice. This course is required for Social Work majors and some Education majors.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 205

    SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND SERVICES I focuses on the political, social, and economic forces that influence the historical evolution of social welfare policy. Specifically the course will examine the treatment of poor people, minorities, women, persons with disabilities, and other historically vulnerable persons. Societal values that support or deter the development of health and social services will be explored.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 210

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I analyzes the growth and development of the individual in the environment from birth through old age. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of the biological, psychological, cultural, spiritual and social forces, which influence human development. Application of course content is made in reference to social work practice.
    Prerequisites: BIO 133 & 134, SOC 101, PSY 105, SWK 203
    3 credit hours


    SWK 307

    GENERALIST PRACTICE I is the first of the three required practice courses. The course prepares students for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities, various diverse populations, and organizations. The course introduces the planned change process and focuses on communication, relationship, and assessment skills and goal planning necessary for generalist practice. This course is restricted to Social Work majors.
    Prerequisites: SWK 203, 205, 210
    3 credit hours


    SWK 308

    GENERALIST PRACTICE II as a continuation of Generalist Practice I focuses on generalist practice with families and groups. Students will examine various types of families and groups, and obtain the skills and knowledge needed to practice at the mezzo level of intervention. Special attention is given to practice involving diverse populations and those at risk of poverty and discrimination. This course is restricted to Social Work majors.
    Prerequisites: SWK 203, SWK 205, SWK, 210, SWK 307
    3 credit hours


    SWK 309

    RACE AND MINORITY is designed to help students understand the sociological and psychological consequences of being a certain race or minority member in a particular society. Students will understand the causes of racism and discrimination and will identify the welfare and policy responses to racism and discrimination. The topics of oppression and exploitation will be studied to help individuals develop sensitivity to at-risk populations.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 313

    SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH introduces students to basic research skills and knowledge, preparing them for lifelong learning and informed professional practice. Students will be introduced to the tools needed to understand, appreciate, evaluate, and apply the body of knowledge relevant to practice in social work and the social sciences. The practice of critical thinking will enable students to develop their abilities to evaluate research studies, apply findings to practice, and evaluate practice outcomes. Students will develop basic skills in problem formulation, methodology, design, data collection and analysis, understanding descriptive statistics, and drawing and evaluating conclusions. The course will also review ethical principles and practice related to social work research as defined by the NASW Code of Ethics.
    Prerequisites: PSY 204, SWK 203, SWK 205
    3 credit hours


    SWK 314

    DEVIANT BEHAVIOR examines the complexity of defining deviance and the influences on individuals engaged in deviant or diverse behaviors. The behaviors will be analyzed using micro and macro theories that explain difference and deviance. Students will be challenged to think about their own preconceptions as well as interventions that can be utilized in social work practice.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 315

    SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY & SERVICES II will link welfare policy with social work practice. Students will understand current social welfare policies and programs and the processes of policy formulation. Students will achieve skills in policy analysis that incorporates principles of social and economic justice.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 307, ECO 201, POL 220
    3 credit hours


    SWK 316

    SOCIAL WORK WITH THE ELDERLY focuses on social work intervention skills and knowledge for practice with the aging and elderly population. Students will examine and understand the developmental challenges associated with the aging process. Students will also understand the emotional, psychological, financial, spiritual and social factors associated with aging and ethical issues associated with intervention with the aged.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 317

    SOCIAL WORK IN MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH CARE SETTINGS will prepare students for professional social work employment in health care and behavioral health settings, including hospitals, inpatient and outpatient mental health settings, home health care, and nursing homes. Students will understand the emotional, psychological, social, spiritual and economic factors associated with mental and physical illness and health care. Students will learn skills needed for interventions with clients in health care settings.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 318

    WORKING WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS introduces the student to the unique considerations for intervention with children and adolescents. The course focuses on the practical application of material as well as the influence of social policy on practice and intervention. Debates, discussions, and videos are utilized to examine relevant, temporal issues and supplement lecture material as well as to provide opportunities for critical analysis.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 331

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II analyzes human functioning from a social systems theoretical perspective including an analysis of functioning at the family, group, organizational, and community level. Course content will also include the contribution of culture, ethnicity, racial composition, gender, populations diverse in age, sexual orientation, spirituality, and disabilities on human functioning.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307
    3 credit hours


    SWK 351

    SPITITUALITY IN THE HELPING PROFESSIONS allows students to examine their faith and enhances awareness regarding how it influences their lives and others that they will serve as professionals. It will help students to understand and provide guidelines for how to use Catholic Social Teaching in their work with clients. It will also enhance awareness of other faith traditions and religions.
    Cross-listed with PSY 351; Prerequisite: PSY 105 or SWK 203
    3 credit hours


    SWK 409

    GENERALIST PRACTICE III focuses on generalist practice with and in larger social systems such as organizations and communities. The goal of social and economic justice is sustained and attention is given to social system change with and on behalf of populations at risk of poverty and discrimination. This course uses student experiences in field placement to enhance understanding. This course is restricted to Social Work majors.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331
    3 credit hours


    SWK 410

    FIELD PRACTICUM I complements the student’s academic work and allows the student to integrate this knowledge through applied social work services in community settings including child and family services, health care, corrections, school systems, shelters, and mental health settings. Under the supervision of a social work field supervisor and departmental social work faculty, the student implements the generalist perspective within applied settings integrating theory, research, and social work professional values and ethics. The student is required to attend a weekly seminar and complete a minimum of 200 clock hours of fieldwork. The course is taken concurrently with SWK 409 Generalist Practice III and enrollment is restricted to Social Work majors.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331
    6 credit hours


    SWK 411

    FIELD PRACTICUM II is a continuation of Field Practicum I. Students are engaged in generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The student’s learning is guided by an agency-based social work supervisor and educationally directed and monitored by a department social work faculty member. A minimum of 200 hours is required in fieldwork. A weekly seminar facilitates integration of theory with field practice.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331, SWK 409, SWK 410
    6 credit hours


    SWK 413

    DEATH, DYING, AND BEREAVEMENT focuses on the human experiences of loss and death. Skills are presented for personal coping and for professional work assisting others in dealing with loss. Various topics covered include death and children, death and the elderly, ethical issues of death and dying, care giving of the dying, and spiritual, financial, economic, and legal issues associated with death and dying.
    3 credit hours


    SWK 437

    SENIOR SOCIAL WORK CAPSTONE gives students the opportunity to review and critically analyze their professional social work education, including the liberal arts base. Assignments are utilized to assess how each student achieved program objectives. Oral presentations, group assignments and mock interviews are utilized to prepare students for professional practice and graduate school. This course is restricted to social work majors.
    Prerequisites: SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331, SWK 409, SWK 410
    3 credit hours



  • Sociology Classes


    SOC 101

    INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY is a scientific study of human behavior involving two or more individuals. It is intended as a general survey of the discipline of sociology, analyzing various institutions that may affect human behavior. Some of the institutions that sociologists study are the family, religions, media, peer groups, and political systems. This course is the prerequisite for all advanced courses in sociology and social work. (Social Science Core)
    3 credit hours


    SOC 106

    CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIETY examines the relationship between religion and human behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to a current sociological perspective for dealing with contemporary social problems and concerns. In addition, students will learn the value of taking a sociological perspective for understanding the various statements and efforts of Christian groups and individuals to address social issues. Students will be encouraged to view social problems from both sociological and Christian perspectives, thereby coming to a deeper appreciation and understanding of the complexity of our lives and our social world. (Social Science Core)
    3 credit hours


    SOC 107

    COMMUNES AND COVENANTS exposes the student to various groups and movements in the United States. Each is described and analyzed in a sociological framework. The groups range from Gypsies, Shakers, Amish, and Oneida, to the Bruderhof Communes of the seventies and the charismatic covenant communities. A search is made for their underlying causes and their probable consequences for both the individual and the larger community.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 204

    MARRIAGE AND FAMILY is a popular course because many students realize that this is a serious vocation and, as a consequence, they wish to learn more mature ways of dealing with it. The general student will appreciate the insights that sociologists have provided—certain ways of looking at husband-wife relations and parent-children relations. Sociology majors will, in addition, acquaint themselves with a special aspect of the general theories of institutions. An attempt at blending these two approaches is made by the instructor and students.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 205

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY deals with the philosophy and history of society’s ideas about crime and what should be done about it. Sociology has uncovered many facets through the use of concepts developed in general sociology as well as in the field of criminology itself. Based on this new knowledge, a number of new theories and new policies are advocated.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 211

    SOCIAL THEORY provides the framework for sociological research. The classical sociologists such as Comte, Spencer, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim will be presented followed by discussions of the modern sociological theories such as functionalism, conflict theory, social exchange, and symbolic interactionism. These theories will be re-evaluated in light of a Christian perspective.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 224

    SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY explores the growth of a social personality, the effects of crowd behavior, the development of values and attitudes, and the mechanics of group life in general. The recognized scholars—Maslow, Goffman, Berger, Luckman, and others—are included in this study of the whole person.
    Cross-listed with PSY 224
    `3 credit hours


    SOC 324

    SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION covers a wide variety of topics including religious social ethics, history of religious movements, church and sect organizations, religion in American society, religion and identity, and the religious aspects of the sociology of knowledge.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 409

    DOMESTIC VIOLENCE examines the violence that exists in many families today. Sociologists and social psychological theories will be presented as possible explanations and solutions to domestic problems. The course will focus on spousal physical and emotional abuse, marital rape, incest, and child abuse.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 410

    JUVENILE DELINQUENCY analyzes juvenile behavior that is beyond parental control and subject to legal action. This course will focus on the social circumstances that promote such behavior, particularly in family situations and peer groups. In addition, the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of the juvenile justice system will be analyzed.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 422

    PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES investigates the basis of knowledge in the social sciences through a study of recent debates. The course deals with problems of theory construction, verification, and the role of models in sociology as well as aspects of the use of the social sciences in the formation of public policy.
    3 credit hours


    SOC 434

    SENIOR THESIS is required of all senior majors. Students will meet with their advisor to discuss their senior thesis, which will be an original library research project.
    1 credit hour

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